dominat negative mutants (View forum version)



SF_HK

Posted 16 February 2009 - 12:39 AM

Hi,

What are dominant negative mutants? E.g. read an article where they transfeted cell lines with dominant negative form of Rac1?

Thanks

molgen

Posted 16 February 2009 - 02:25 AM

I think it means that the line has a dominant mutation of a loss of function.

If you give the reference of the article we might be more helpful.

molgen

Posted 16 February 2009 - 02:28 AM

from wikipedia:

Dominant negative mutations (also called antimorphic mutations) have an altered gene product that acts antagonistically to the wild-type allele. These mutations usually result in an altered molecular function (often inactive) and are characterised by a dominant or semi-dominant phenotype. In humans, Marfan syndrome is an example of a dominant negative mutation occurring in an autosomal dominant disease. In this condition, the defective glycoprotein product of the fibrillin gene (FBN1) antagonizes the product of the normal allele.

SF_HK

Posted 16 February 2009 - 05:17 PM

I think it means that the line has a dominant mutation of a loss of function.

If you give the reference of the article we might be more helpful.


Hi, the ref is: Cel 133, 340-353, 2008. Figure 1E.

thanks