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what is the role of sodium azide in binding buffer - antibody purification (Dec/28/2005 )

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i want to know abt each and every chemical function in antibody purification .can anyony send abt this information please.
1.binding buffer(glycine,nacl&sodium azide)ph-8.6to9
2.elution bufferb1(citric acid(trisodium salt&anhydrous)&sodium azide)ph 5.5
3.elution buffer b2(glycine&sodium azide)ph-2.5-3

-praveenkumar thummala-

Azide is generally used to stop bacterial growth in your buffers.

Ceri

-Ceri-

Azide is an inhibitor of the electron transport chain and very toxic to bacteria, bacteria would be very happy in those buffers, so if you plan on storing them, I would definitely use the azide, otherwise it will not help or hinder your buffer.

-Jon Peterson-

but it is also toxic on mammalian cells, even at very low concentration, so if you plan to use your antibody on cells in vitro or even in vivo do not use azide at all and filter sterile your product

Seb_

-tryptofan-

Micr-o-protect is more user friendly as sodium azide is now forbidden in many countries

-fred_33-

QUOTE (fred_33 @ Jan 4 2006, 04:29 AM)
Micr-o-protect is more user friendly as sodium azide is now forbidden in many countries


Why is sodium azide ban? We got a lot of sodim azide in our lab!! blink.gif

-Minnie Mouse-

Because it is very very very toxic.

-Dynein-

azide is very similar in action to cyanide, very toxic, I always open the bottle in the hood and I hold my breath for good measure. blink.gif ohmy.gif wink.gif

-Jon Peterson-

it's writen on the bottle "very toxic"...

S├ębastien_

-tryptofan-

very very very toxic it is better to read carefully about it before openning the vial.

-microbiologydepartment-

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