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What do I do with this woman? - (Nov/26/2012 )

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leelee on Sun Dec 9 15:56:27 2012 said:


I don't know, maybe I try to look for the best in people, rather than suspect the worst. I just really don't see a few unanswered emails as that egregious.

The way I see it, being gifted this plasmid is worthy of acknowledgement (not authorship, obviously) in any publication arising- regardless of any other conduct.

Anywho, either we are misunderstanding each other- or will have to agree to disagree on this one (it happens, no hard feelings )


I also look for the best in people...

And I am not saying that a few unaswered emails are egregious (learned a new word here) , however before you put someones name in a paper you need to inform the person about this!
If she does not respond to your question about putting her name (and about the plasmid) then no, you should not add her name in the paper!

Having your name in a paper is a big deal.. (not even if its as an author, believe it or not, some people would not want it).

The discussion is not about the unanswered emails itself, but about the content of those emails (and the plasmid).


If it was me: I would do anything to clear it out, send email (with draft of the paper for example and a note where her name is mentioned so she does need to reply) and an emal about the problem with the plasmid, call her ...
If I do not get any response, I would try one last time mentioning I would not add her in the paper because I do not have her consent for putting her name in...
Still no reaction: nop, would not add her name in the paper.

But I would not only contact her, I would try to contact others in her lab too... I can hardly imagine she is the only one working with this plasmid.



PS. he could also refer to the lab rather then the person that send the plasmid...

-pito-

somebody else made it. She just stores it and she is the one who send it to me after she was asked to by the person who made it. I think I'm just gonna acknowledge her in my article, or as Pito suggested just acknowledge the lab.

-Curtis-

Curtis on Mon Dec 10 04:26:12 2012 said:


somebody else made it. She just stores it and she is the one who send it to me after she was asked to by the person who made it. I think I'm just gonna acknowledge her in my article, or as Pito suggested just acknowledge the lab.

Sounds like she is a lab tech..
You dont need to bother her with question, but the one that made it...

-pito-

pito on Sun Dec 9 16:36:30 2012 said:


leelee on Sun Dec 9 15:56:27 2012 said:


I don't know, maybe I try to look for the best in people, rather than suspect the worst. I just really don't see a few unanswered emails as that egregious.

The way I see it, being gifted this plasmid is worthy of acknowledgement (not authorship, obviously) in any publication arising- regardless of any other conduct.

Anywho, either we are misunderstanding each other- or will have to agree to disagree on this one (it happens, no hard feelings )


I also look for the best in people...

And I am not saying that a few unaswered emails are egregious (learned a new word here) , however before you put someones name in a paper you need to inform the person about this!
If she does not respond to your question about putting her name (and about the plasmid) then no, you should not add her name in the paper!

Having your name in a paper is a big deal.. (not even if its as an author, believe it or not, some people would not want it).

The discussion is not about the unanswered emails itself, but about the content of those emails (and the plasmid).


If it was me: I would do anything to clear it out, send email (with draft of the paper for example and a note where her name is mentioned so she does need to reply) and an emal about the problem with the plasmid, call her ...
If I do not get any response, I would try one last time mentioning I would not add her in the paper because I do not have her consent for putting her name in...
Still no reaction: nop, would not add her name in the paper.

But I would not only contact her, I would try to contact others in her lab too... I can hardly imagine she is the only one working with this plasmid.



PS. he could also refer to the lab rather then the person that send the plasmid...


You make some good points, I hadn't considered that it is better to get permission before putting somebody's name to something.

Reminds me of someone I used to work with, who insisted on having her name removed from a paper by one of her previous grad students- he "reanalysed" (I use the term loosely) some data generated while in her lab and his work was TERRIBLE. Despite many conversations first asking and then insisting he change it, he and his new boss did not agree and she didn't want to be associated with his, frankly embarrassing claims. They agreed to remove her name, but it never got published in the end anyway (no surprise there).

-leelee-
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