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Silinizing plastic - (Mar/09/2014 )

Hi, I need to silinize plastic (eppendorffs, 96-well plates, tips)  for my experiments ( to avoid protein adhesion). I would use hexane and dichlorodimethylsilane soultion. I googled it  and most information is about glassware silanization..Right now I understood that I need to just wash plastic with silanization solution and leave to dry. I also think that I can reuse this solution (I am not gonna store it but reuse it for multiple eppendorffs).. Dose anyone have helpful tips? Or corrections?

Thank you!

-keegi-

Though not working with proteins I'm not sure if it's really necessary and never heard about doing this (which is hopefully not my fault). Anyway low-bind plastics and some caution (keeping proteins in solution, not too long standing time in tubes) might be enough for normal applications (perhaps not if you work with trace analyses of proteins).
And I'm actually not even sure if it's possible to silanize plastics such as polypropylene, since silanization is a reaction between hydroxyl groups (e.g. of glassware) which attack and displace the alkoxy groups on the silane thus forming a Si-O-Si- bond (from wikipedia). Polypropylene is just (C3H6)n

Therefore have a look if it's really necessary.

-hobglobin-

Though not working with proteins I'm not sure if it's really necessary and never heard about doing this (which is hopefully not my fault). Anyway low-bind plastics and some caution (keeping proteins in solution, not too long standing time in tubes) might be enough for normal applications (perhaps not if you work with trace analyses of proteins).
And I'm actually not even sure if it's possible to silanize plastics such as polypropylene, since silanization is a reaction between hydroxyl groups (e.g. of glassware) which attack and displace the alkoxy groups on the silane thus forming a Si-O-Si- bond (from wikipedia). Polypropylene is just (C3H6)n

Therefore have a look if it's really necessary.

Thanks! It seemed pretty weird for me too. Although I did not thought about polypropylene chemistry  biggrin.png  I have to do receptor binding studies...Previously they have silainized plastic in my lab.. Maybe its because of very low c. Anyway I will ask.

-keegi-

well of course it might be another type of plastics with hydroxyl groups or is it perhaps siliconising? I.e. something completely different (but sounding similar) using a silicon based oil to coat the surface?

-hobglobin-

you can purchase siliconized tubes from various sources like this (fisher).

 

it will be easier, more consistent and safer.

-mdfenko-