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What interested you into doing research? What research? Why? - (Jul/18/2013 )

I am (was) really interested in researching. I have very innovative ideas that can be researched for many diseases, but easily get denied by other lab workers. Not because of "it can be researched," but because somehow they have magically already researched it and know it won't work. There is a negative atmosphere in the lab. The lab next door is enjoying everything and positive.

I hope to find a different research environment when I do undergrad.

So...what do you like most about working at the lab?!?!


Looks like, you are new to your lab and trying to adjust...If my guess is right then I can imagine why you are talking about negative environment in the lab. If you discuss anything with your labmates and they don't support you, don't get perturb or disappoint, everybody's hands and the way of doing research/experiments are different, try to convince or try the experiment and then discuss again.

I hope you will take this in a positive way




so what is your current level of research experience ? Are you an undergrad ? Because it's usually like this, if the other members in the lab have more experience they tend to think little of a newbie's ideas simply because 1. they do have more experience (so technically, they do know what is more likely to work or not) and 2. they tend to stick with their own (sometimes dogmatic) views, which they are not going to be disturbed by an undergrad's general ideas or similar.
But don't let any of this put you off your ideas !!
If you suggest ideas, take care to study the literature before (what has been done ? why do you think their approach did not work ? has your method been used in other fields of research yet ? has your method ever been used at all or is it something to newly establish ? etc.) and present a clear concept including what is known in the literature, why your idea might be useful, and also what your plan is in case your experiments do not work out as planned. Like this you can show them you have well thought it over (and are not "yet another research newbie trying to save the world"). Try to be specific. When you state in your post "I have very innovative ideas that can be researched for many diseases", it sounds a little general to me (When I was at school I had some general ideas too, but soon realized that they are much too general and woth nothing when you have not studied the literature in detail. Also, I knew nothing about methods back then, so it was seriously flawed at that time.). Uttering general ideas is unlikely to be taken seriously by older lab members, but specific experimental plans have a better chance. Maybe just focus on one field of research and do it as I wrote above.
And I agree with neuron that it's normal in a new lab, but when the environment really stays unsupportive, change the lab. Find a supportive and open-minded environment, that's really important. This guy wrote to 200 labs to be given a chance to try his idea and got 199 rejections before he found a lab where he could do his experiments.
Don't give up