Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

What are DNA-RNA Hybrids?


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 dreww

dreww

    RNA Follower

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 36 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 31 July 2009 - 01:23 AM

1st year molecular student wondering about this, i read about them being stable, but i need answers that are more in depth. Anything helps, thanks guys!

#2 fishdoc

fishdoc

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 272 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 31 July 2009 - 03:42 AM

1st year molecular student wondering about this, i read about them being stable, but i need answers that are more in depth. Anything helps, thanks guys!




More in depth about what part of RNA/DNA hybrids?

It is a ssDNA that has annealed to a complementary RNA.

#3 perneseblue

perneseblue

    Unlimited ligation works!

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 578 posts
17
Good

Posted 31 July 2009 - 03:46 AM

1st year molecular student wondering about this, i read about them being stable, but i need answers that are more in depth. Anything helps, thanks guys!

More in depth about what part of RNA/DNA hybrids?
It is a ssDNA that has annealed to a complementary RNA.


Do you mean a triplex nucleaotide strand composed of dsDNA and ssRNA

Or

do you literally mean a nucleotide strand that is composed of DNA and RNA?
May your PCR products be long, your protocols short and your boss on holiday

#4 Penguin

Penguin

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 64 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 31 July 2009 - 04:15 AM

1st year molecular student wondering about this, i read about them being stable, but i need answers that are more in depth. Anything helps, thanks guys!


Hey,
They mostly occur during transcription when the newly synthesized mRNA can bind to it's complementary region of DNA. Also they are important in RNA viruses that need to reverse transcribe their RNA genome into DNA (and back again).

p

#5 dreww

dreww

    RNA Follower

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 36 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 31 July 2009 - 01:38 PM

So how are they useful in research and what kind of things can you use them for? applications?




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.