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EDTA as denaturating agent ??


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5 replies to this topic

#1 rick112

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Posted 05 July 2009 - 09:21 PM

hi

how effective is EDTA as denaturing agent for proteins???

#2 mdfenko

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Posted 06 July 2009 - 08:22 AM

if you have a metallo-protein then it may denature the protein by removing the metal.

otherwise, i have never heard of its use in the denaturing of protein.
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#3 HomeBrew

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Posted 06 July 2009 - 01:40 PM

It is frequently used in protein storage buffers...

Other than some specialized proteins that require coordination with various metal ions to retain their state (as mdfenko points out), I wouldn't consider EDTA a denaturing agent.

#4 rick112

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 01:00 AM

thanks HomeBrew and mdfenko for the reply...

i also had similar opinion its just that one of my colleague had such a strong view on this...that i felt i must conform it...

ok..lets just trun the question little around :wacko:

what makes 'Urea' and 'GuHCL (Guanidine Hydrochloride)' such a good denaturing agents for proteins??

#5 mdfenko

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 06:35 AM

this comes from wikipedia:

urea breaks non-covalent bonds.

guanidinium chloride is a powerful protein denaturant. wiki references a book from 1978:

Lapange, Savo (1978). Physicochemical aspects of protein denaturation. New York: Wiley. ISBN 0471034096.

you can also get information on protein denaturation in the handbook of chemistry and physics.
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#6 hobglobin

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 11:22 AM

It inactivates enzymes that need bivalent metal ions as coenzymes. But this is not a denaturation....

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
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