Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

amount of proteins in urine


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 ujla80

ujla80

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 70 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 05 July 2009 - 09:10 AM

hi all

can anybody tell me the amount of proteins excreted in urine of normal beings? is lowry a good method for detecting urinary proteins?
help me please.... :P
god is great

#2 HomeBrew

HomeBrew

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 930 posts
16
Good

Posted 05 July 2009 - 12:52 PM

Accoring to here, the normal range of total protein on urinalysis is 6.3-8.2 gm/dL. But, according to here, the normal value is "negative". I suppose it depends on the sensitivity of the assay used.

BTW, 63 - 82 g/L seems pretty high to me...

#3 hobglobin

hobglobin

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,545 posts
104
Excellent

Posted 05 July 2009 - 12:55 PM

Accoring to here, the normal range of total protein on urinalysis is 6.3-8.2 gm/dL. But, according to here, the normal value is "negative". I suppose it depends on the sensitivity of the assay used.

But the in first link also gives negative-trace Protein in Urinalysis...I guess normally a test strip (showing different intensity of lilac staining) is used for routine analysis...don't know how sensitive this method is.
But after stress such as sports etc. the protein concentration is raised at least temporarily.

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#4 ujla80

ujla80

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 70 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 05 July 2009 - 06:12 PM

thanx ;)

i am looking for proteinuria in mice urine samples. with lowry i get very high protein levels 160mg/dl-3000mg/dl in controls(normal healthy mice)...whereas when i do strip test i get lower amounts i.e trace-100mg/dl....what could be the reason of such high values with lowry?
god is great

#5 Gerard

Gerard

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 124 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 06 July 2009 - 05:45 AM

Is it possible your using a teststrip that only detects albumin? :)
Ockham's razor
Pluralitas non est ponenda sine necessitate
-- "You must assume no plural without necessity".

#6 mdfenko

mdfenko

    an elder

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,811 posts
135
Excellent

Posted 06 July 2009 - 07:57 AM

you are probably above the useful range of the lowry assay.

clinical labs use the biuret protein assay. it is useful for greater amounts of protein than lowry.
talent does what it can
genius does what it must
i do what i get paid to do

#7 ujla80

ujla80

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 70 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 06 July 2009 - 08:16 AM

the test strip is more sensitive to albumin than other proteins...

m going to use biurett method and see the results. :)
god is great

#8 DRT

DRT

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 162 posts
7
Neutral

Posted 06 July 2009 - 07:21 PM

Wouldn’t the ammonium/urea type compounds in urine cause problems for both the Biuret and Lowry assays or are the concentrations too low to worry about?
Is it possible that the pH was different between the standards and samples for the Lowry assay?

#9 mdfenko

mdfenko

    an elder

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,811 posts
135
Excellent

Posted 07 July 2009 - 08:02 AM

Wouldn't the ammonium/urea type compounds in urine cause problems for both the Biuret and Lowry assays or are the concentrations too low to worry about?
Is it possible that the pH was different between the standards and samples for the Lowry assay?

urea won't significantly affect the assay. biuret has a peptide-like bond which is detected by the assay, urea doesn't (although, there may be some biuret in the urea and that will be detected).

the pH of the samples won't have a significant effect on the lowry (or biuret). the reagent has enough naoh to maintain a basic environment.
talent does what it can
genius does what it must
i do what i get paid to do

#10 sgt4boston

sgt4boston

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 276 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 17 August 2009 - 11:27 AM

Are you looking for particular proteins? Gammopathies?

#11 chdd

chdd

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 20 August 2009 - 12:26 PM

i had used Bradford method(Coomassie brilliant blue G-250) to assay proteins in urine,it seems good.

#12 ujla80

ujla80

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 70 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 22 August 2009 - 10:38 PM

no not specific proteins. i am just looking for proteinuria...


Are you looking for particular proteins? Gammopathies?


god is great

#13 ujla80

ujla80

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 70 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 22 August 2009 - 10:41 PM

hi :lol:

did u dilute the urine sample if yes then how much dilution?


i had used Bradford method(Coomassie brilliant blue G-250) to assay proteins in urine,it seems good.


god is great




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.