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lowry method


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6 replies to this topic

#1 ujla80

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 07:38 AM

hi all :D

i have checked the original paper of lowry for protein analysis but i didn't get the idea why we add sodium-potassium tartarate in the lowry reagent and i also want to know that does follin reagent react with free aromatic amino acids.

ujla80 :(

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#2 mdfenko

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 08:01 AM

i have checked the original paper of lowry for protein analysis but i didn't get the idea why we add sodium-potassium tartarate in the lowry reagent

i'm not sure if it is the only reason but the tartrate helps keep the copper in solution.
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#3 ujla80

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 11:12 PM

:) thanks.... can you please tell me how does sodium-potassium tartrate helps keep copper in solution? does it inhibit the copper precipitation? :)
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#4 klinmed

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 03:25 AM

hi all :huh:

i have checked the original paper of lowry for protein analysis but i didn't get the idea why we add sodium-potassium tartarate in the lowry reagent and i also want to know that does follin reagent react with free aromatic amino acids.

ujla80 :)

The method is based on the biuret reaction. Tartrate is added as a chelator (stabilizer) as it forms the soluble complex ion "alkaline copper tartrate". The Lowry reaction mechanism is not well understood, but involves reduction of the Folin reagent and oxidation of aromatic residues (mainly tryptophan, also tyrosine).

Hope this helps.

#5 mdfenko

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 06:10 AM

here is some literature to help you understand the chemistry:

Attached Files


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#6 mdfenko

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 06:12 AM

and these originals:

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#7 ujla80

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 08:12 AM

thank you so much for giving me the literature...it is really helpfull... now it is clear to me that free tryptophan and tyrosine do react with folin-reagent to enhance the blue color in lowry. :huh:
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