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Identification if these bacteria are sporeforming or nonsporeforming.


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#1 Soulshine

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 12:30 PM

Would someone be able to help me trying to find if these genus/species are sporeforming or none sporeforming:

Aerococcus viridians
Aeromonas caviae
Aeromonas hydrophila
Corynebacterium xerosis ( Positive sporeforming? )
Corynebacterium pseudodipthericium
Escherichia coli ( Non sporeforming
Lactobacillus acidophilus
Micrococcus roseus ( Nonsporeforming )?
Proteus mirabilis ( Non sporeforming )?
Proteus vulgaris ( Non sporeforming )?
Providencia alcalifaciens
Rhodococcus rhodochrous
Serratia marcescnes
Sporosarcina ureae
Staphylococcus aereus

I have tried Google, and I only found a few of them. To know if they are spore forming or nonsporeforming would help me greatly identifying my unknown. Thank you.

#2 gebirgsziege

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 10:40 PM

Sounds like a homework question?

Have a look at which bacterial taxa (e.g. Bacillus) can form spores?
Look to which taxa do the bacteria you mentioned belong (e.g. Serratia belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae and therefore does not form spores).
A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies. (Oscar Wilde)

#3 Soulshine

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 04:55 AM

Sounds like a homework question?

Have a look at which bacterial taxa (e.g. Bacillus) can form spores?
Look to which taxa do the bacteria you mentioned belong (e.g. Serratia belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae and therefore does not form spores).

It's for my unknown; My unknown is gram positive rod. I know bacillus form spores, and I've deleted that from my possible list. Sometimes the genus/species is different have different characteristics.

#4 gebirgsziege

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 05:56 AM

But there are many gram- on your list???????????
A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies. (Oscar Wilde)

#5 GeorgeWolff

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 06:50 AM

Look in Bergey's. Sporulation is not a variable character within a genus - it typically defines the genus. Not sure why you eliminated Bacillus but the input is right - there are only three nominal Gram + bacilli in the entire list.

#6 Soulshine

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 06:55 AM

But there are many gram- on your list???????????

Oh, I forgot to mention that this is my 1 rule out bacteria. For example, Aeromas caviae is a gram neg rod.
I know one thing for sure: I made a mistake. I'll probably choose the wrong bacteria to identify this unknown.
lol Maybe you could help me out a lil bit. My unknown is clear on agar slant, but when put on 37 *Celsius, it turned into pinkish red.
I am thinking of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, because when viewed my unknown under the microscope, it looks more like a cocci, then when I indirect stain, it showed a rod shape. The test that I've done so far is aerotolerance, catalase, and oxidase. My teacher confirmed that it's F anaerobe. My catalase test was a positive and an oxidase negative.

Edited by Soulshine, 23 June 2009 - 07:01 AM.


#7 GeorgeWolff

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 04:40 PM

Appeards you can complete your homework on your own.




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