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x-ray films vs direct imaging


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#1 almost a doctor

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 12:54 AM

Hi guys,
I've been asked to source all the equipment and reagents needed to set up western blot in the lab, starting from scratch (all we have is a Nupage electrophoresis tank). I know my preferences for transfer system, membranes, reagents.... but I'm having doubts on the developing method. In the past I've always used ECL and x-ray films, but I know more and more labs these days favour other chemiluminescent reagents and imaging as you get a better control on exposure and a better dynamic range.

So here's my question.

What method do you use to develop a western? :lol:


Please share your opinions

Thanks! :lol:

#2 bob1

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 04:30 PM

Films still have better resolution and usually sensitivty than cameras in my experience. However, the cost of running a darkroom with film and developing chemicals and associated equipment is quite high. Modern cameras are pretty good though and give nice images with reasonable exposure times (compared with 3-5 years ago) based on chemiluminescent detection.

Have you thought about chromogenic detection?

#3 LostintheLab

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 05:04 PM

I"ve used both X-rays and digital imaging- we have a Fujifilm CCD system in the lab now, which is very convient- less mess and less time for developing as our nearest dark room in 2 floors below us and we have to book in. The advantage of the digital images is that they are easily transferred and you can carry out some quantitative analysis on them more easily too.
I agree the sensitivity of the films can sometimes be better, but its not been an issue for me. I'm pretty converted to the Digital imaging now.
We use in conjunction with ECL, but our system allows us to take images in a number of wavelengths so can be used for other methods too.
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#4 almost a doctor

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 06:38 AM

Thank you guys! putting a list together now, will see what my manager goes for :o

#5 warsel

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 08:37 AM

Thank you guys! putting a list together now, will see what my manager goes for :P


I would almost always go for the CCD variant - you always get the best exposure that way.

But beware, there is a HUGE difference between imagers - some are really crap, some are really good, and the price alone often doesn't tell you which is which.

#6 almost a doctor

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 12:50 AM

Thank you guys! putting a list together now, will see what my manager goes for :D


I would almost always go for the CCD variant - you always get the best exposure that way.

But beware, there is a HUGE difference between imagers - some are really crap, some are really good, and the price alone often doesn't tell you which is which.


Thanks for pointing that out. What do you think about Alpha Innotech? My old lab now has that and they are quite happy. Which one would you recommend? As you say there are many and I'm no expert in imagin so I dont even know what I have to look for. :P

#7 warsel

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Posted 23 June 2009 - 08:06 AM

Thank you guys! putting a list together now, will see what my manager goes for :D


I would almost always go for the CCD variant - you always get the best exposure that way.

But beware, there is a HUGE difference between imagers - some are really crap, some are really good, and the price alone often doesn't tell you which is which.


Thanks for pointing that out. What do you think about Alpha Innotech? My old lab now has that and they are quite happy. Which one would you recommend? As you say there are many and I'm no expert in imagin so I dont even know what I have to look for. :)


I have used an older Alpha Innotech, that was a good one, the current ones from Bio-Rad also aren't bad.
We settled on the MF-ChemiBIS which was the best deal overall (although the software has its issues sometimes).

#8 fysio lab

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 12:11 AM

Hey
We've been working with films the last years, but we are changing to a camera now (cleaner and handier). We asked 3 companies to show their equipment: we had fujifilm (nice and simple, bit limited), bertholds (nope bad experience, representatives didn't manage to make a good picture) and Westburg (nice! and a good price )
Hope this can help you?
Grs

#9 Lenovo

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 07:50 PM

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#10 keetynice

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 12:24 AM

we are changing to a camera now
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#11 lola

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 01:37 AM

so what is the problem in that.....you can go through different sites and books and enhance your knowledge in this field...

#12 ravirajcdc

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 02:42 AM

Thanks for the sharing the additional information.

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#13 nicolas

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Posted 10 April 2010 - 12:49 PM

And moving to camera is interesting because films boxes are expensive!

#14 SEO Services India

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 04:36 AM

I"ve used both X-rays and digital imaging- we have a Fujifilm CCD system in the lab now, which is very convient- less mess and less time for developing as our nearest dark room in 2 floors below us and we have to book in. The advantage of the digital images is that they are easily transferred and you can carry out some quantitative analysis on them more easily too.
I agree the sensitivity of the films can sometimes be better, but its not been an issue for me. I'm pretty converted to the Digital imaging now.
We use in conjunction with ECL, but our system allows us to take images in a number of wavelengths so can be used for other methods too.


Hii,

I'm new in this field and had same doubt in my mind. Thanks for Clarification.
Keep Posting. I would like to know more about New Techniques in Imaging.

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#15 Website Developers India

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Posted 12 April 2010 - 09:42 PM

Hello,

Very nice forum for discussion.Thanks for sharing with us.

Regards
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