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Being good at the bench


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14 replies to this topic

#1 jangajarn

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 11:06 AM

Hey guys,
Being a relatively new graduate student in a big lab where people do not have time to train me, I wanted to train myself. I read this book "At the bench" by Kathy Barker and wrote down things which were important for me. But nevertheless I thought it might be useful to somebody else also. I've attached the document with this post.
Enjoy!

Attached Files



#2 hanming86

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 06:40 PM

Hey guys,
Being a relatively new graduate student in a big lab where people do not have time to train me, I wanted to train myself. I read this book "At the bench" by Kathy Barker and wrote down things which were important for me. But nevertheless I thought it might be useful to somebody else also. I've attached the document with this post.
Enjoy!



Don't adhere too much to the rules though. 50 times or not , sometimes variation from the standard protocol gives u what you want. Bioforum is made for this.
Lab + Coffee + Music = Bliss

#3 Dominic

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 07:28 AM

Being a relatively new graduate student in a big lab where people do not have time to train me,


training you is part of THEIR training, never feel guilty about asking - a good scientist will always help you out.
books can only give you so much - one on one training is the cornerstone of good experimental technique

if someone is too busy to let you watch while they explain what they are doing - then they are crap scientists

d

#4 themoon

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 04:09 AM

Hey guys,
Being a relatively new graduate student in a big lab where people do not have time to train me, I wanted to train myself. I read this book "At the bench" by Kathy Barker and wrote down things which were important for me. But nevertheless I thought it might be useful to somebody else also. I've attached the document with this post.
Enjoy!



it's a very good start to read up on the basics, however never solely rely on manuals etc to 'teach' you everything you need to know ;) these manuals will give you the background knowledge and fundamentals.. but being a truly competent scientist in the lab is achieved by practice and making a lot of mistakes! don't be afraid to ask questions. i know exactly how you feel. even if you think you might feel stupid for asking too many questions - it will help both you and the person teaching you! always make the most of the scientist that is there - ask lots of questions and jot down whatever you can. each individual scientist will give you certain handy points you might not get from one.. so yeh.. ask whoever you can! Also, make sure that when you're reading about methods/protocols.. you ask yourself why they are doing it a particular way and try to find out how it can be performed easier and cheaper. adapt what you read in manuals to suit your needs.
I think the most important part of being a scientist is to never stop asking why. once you find out all the answers to the 'whys', it is only then where you can start to improve yourself as a scientist and the techniques which you employ.

woah ive talked too much!

Edited by themoon, 29 June 2009 - 04:24 AM.


#5 DocFlow

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 03:52 AM

The main advise I have given to anybody I've supervised is to be prepared for interruption. whether you're handling 3 or 300 tubes it should not matter if someone comes into the lab and interrupts you. You should be able to go back exactly at the correct tube to add 2Ál of a reagent. This is mainly done by using different positions for the tubes:
1:Before adding -it's in this rack.
2: when adding the reagent, add it, close it and place the tube in another rack.

If someone drops by, the phone rings or anything and you have to focus on that it's no problem to know where you were once you're back with your experiment.

#6 Genifer

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 06:40 AM

Hi all !

I'm new member and I'm new to do research ! The content of this book must be very good ! Have you had this ebook ? If so, can you share me ?

Thank you in advance !

my email : kimhao0904@gmail.com

#7 sgt4boston

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 07:14 AM

I agree with all above. Should add:
1. Make sure besides yourself another person (not working on the project)reads and signs your notebook.
2. line out and intial corrections.

always always ask questions you are not a robot.

Don't be interrupted during an intricate experiment; time can be a factor in the reaction.

#8 michaelmast

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Posted 25 February 2010 - 07:58 AM

Hi everyone, base on my experience whether you're handling many tubes it should not matter if someone comes into the lab and interrupts you. You should be able to go back exactly at the correct tube to add 2Ál of a reagent. This is mainly done by using different positions for the tubes

#9 DNAgeek

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 06:55 PM

Being a relatively new graduate student in a big lab where people do not have time to train me,


training you is part of THEIR training, never feel guilty about asking - a good scientist will always help you out.
books can only give you so much - one on one training is the cornerstone of good experimental technique

if someone is too busy to let you watch while they explain what they are doing - then they are crap scientists

d



I agree, if they don't have time to train a grad student, they shouldn't hire one in the first place. You can't learn bench work from a book and hiring a grad student is for the purpose of training them.

#10 JELLY

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 10:57 AM

Keep an on CRGE


please also comment about it.

#11 Nephrite

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 01:26 AM

Hey guys,
Being a relatively new graduate student in a big lab where people do not have time to train me, I wanted to train myself. I read this book "At the bench" by Kathy Barker and wrote down things which were important for me. But nevertheless I thought it might be useful to somebody else also. I've attached the document with this post.
Enjoy!



Thank you :-) Well, I am somehow experienced already, but if I had this few years before, I would not have to repeat some things :-)

#12 sxh999

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 09:28 AM

waaa, such a good text, thank you so much.
I am thinking if I can post it in my lab so everyone in my lab can learn something, if you don't mind of course. :P
Anyway, like many people said, experience is very important too, and everything should be suitable to your own samples. There are lots of tricks in molecular experiments...Good luck to everybody.

#13 GSUOC

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 01:19 PM

Hey guys,
Being a relatively new graduate student in a big lab where people do not have time to train me, I wanted to train myself. I read this book "At the bench" by Kathy Barker and wrote down things which were important for me. But nevertheless I thought it might be useful to somebody else also. I've attached the document with this post.
Enjoy!

Thank you for this document. This is really a very good one following which would give consistent results in lab.

#14 Matrixwoo

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Posted 20 December 2011 - 10:23 PM

thanks for your sharing. Posted Image

#15 Divya Pothula

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 09:43 PM

Hi Thanks for Sharing...I am a new graduate trying my hands on research...Any research updates or papers like this are highly appreciated. Cheers;)




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