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4 replies to this topic

#1 samita

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 01:08 AM

I want to ask about health insurance issue. A post doc in USA or canada have a health insuracne from the empoyer or one have to buy it by himself. If some one can educate me over this then I shall be very thankful to him.

#2 sgt4boston

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 08:47 AM

In USA most employers provide heath insurance. There are many different policies. Some employers pay all fees others require minimal contribution each pay period. There are also 'deductibles' and 'co-payments' depending upon service provided. (or policy can be fantastic and NO payments are required by employee)

For example doctor visit may be fully covered or require $20 payment.
Service provided by institution example Xray may be covered or require payment (full payment which is part of the 'deductible'). Deductible can range from $500 to $1,000+ before full financial coverage provided.

In USA (Ma) is the ONLY state which requires health insurance. Either employer provides or person (resident) can secure through one of several insurance copanies operating in state.

In Canada, I believe (not very familiar with insurance in that country) all medical coverage is provided to all citizens free.

#3 samita

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 01:02 AM

Thnaks for the information. About canada citizens means people who are working there on work permit also includes in this or they have to pay for their health.


In USA most employers provide heath insurance. There are many different policies. Some employers pay all fees others require minimal contribution each pay period. There are also 'deductibles' and 'co-payments' depending upon service provided. (or policy can be fantastic and NO payments are required by employee)

For example doctor visit may be fully covered or require $20 payment.
Service provided by institution example Xray may be covered or require payment (full payment which is part of the 'deductible'). Deductible can range from $500 to $1,000+ before full financial coverage provided.

In USA (Ma) is the ONLY state which requires health insurance. Either employer provides or person (resident) can secure through one of several insurance copanies operating in state.

In Canada, I believe (not very familiar with insurance in that country) all medical coverage is provided to all citizens free.



#4 casandra

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 12:08 PM

Thnaks for the information. About canada citizens means people who are working there on work permit also includes in this or they have to pay for their health.


In USA most employers provide heath insurance. There are many different policies. Some employers pay all fees others require minimal contribution each pay period. There are also 'deductibles' and 'co-payments' depending upon service provided. (or policy can be fantastic and NO payments are required by employee)

For example doctor visit may be fully covered or require $20 payment.
Service provided by institution example Xray may be covered or require payment (full payment which is part of the 'deductible'). Deductible can range from $500 to $1,000+ before full financial coverage provided.

In USA (Ma) is the ONLY state which requires health insurance. Either employer provides or person (resident) can secure through one of several insurance copanies operating in state.

In Canada, I believe (not very familiar with insurance in that country) all medical coverage is provided to all citizens free.

I think (but you may have to double-check this with your prospective boss/PI) that if you're not a citizen or a permanent resident then you don't have access to our public healthcare system. However, since you're going to belong to the university (whether as a grad student or postdoc) or even a company for that matter, you'd probably get a group or collective coverage meaning you'd pay less premium but with the full benefits of the insurance...also, in some provinces like Ontario..the people have to personally contribute a bit to the system so it's not really entirely free....

Edited by casandra, 30 April 2009 - 03:04 PM.

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#5 AussieUSA

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 04:40 AM

Hi Samita,
I am an Aussie who postdoc'ed in the US. With every job I had while on a J2 visa, the employer (university) subsidised my health insurance ... it was part of the package. I later became a permanent resident and was granted a postdoc at the NIH. There my health insurance was paid in full. If I went into a full-time employed/academic position, then I would have had to pay for my insurance, through my employer.

Does this help?

AussieUSA.




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