Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

What does the DH5alpha mean in E.coli DH5alpha bacteria


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 minemin

minemin

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 26 April 2009 - 09:30 AM

Hi everyone,

I'm using E coli DH5a for my transformations, and I was wondering what the DH5alpha stands for.
Is there anyone who can help me?
Thank you

#2 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,513 posts
371
Excellent

Posted 26 April 2009 - 05:49 PM

It is a strain name, much as E. coli O15H is a famous pathogenic strain.

#3 minemin

minemin

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 27 April 2009 - 11:14 AM

It is a strain name, much as E. coli O15H is a famous pathogenic strain.

I know it's a strain name, but I was interested if the D H 5a has some meaning. Some special features or something

#4 HomeBrew

HomeBrew

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 930 posts
15
Good

Posted 27 April 2009 - 12:27 PM

The original reference is: Bethesda Research Laboratories. 1986. BRL pUC host: E. coli DH5α competent cells. Focus 8(2):9. (see here). DH5α was derived from E. coli DH5, described in Hanahan, D. 1985. in DNA Cloning: A Practical Approach. Glover, D. M. (ed.), Vol. 1, p. 109, IRL Press, McLean, Virginia. "DH" are the initials of Doug Hanahan.

#5 swanny

swanny

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 367 posts
8
Neutral

Posted 27 April 2009 - 03:18 PM

The original reference is: Bethesda Research Laboratories. 1986. BRL pUC host: E. coli DH5α competent cells. Focus 8(2):9. (see here). DH5α was derived from E. coli DH5, described in Hanahan, D. 1985. in DNA Cloning: A Practical Approach. Glover, D. M. (ed.), Vol. 1, p. 109, IRL Press, McLean, Virginia. "DH" are the initials of Doug Hanahan.

Nice to be remembered for posterity by having a strain of bug named after you! Like good ole Dr Escherich! Could be worse, I suppose: you might have some horrible skin condition with your name on it!!! :wacko: :D
Heart disease kills more women than breast cancer, but heart attack symptoms differ from men's symptoms. Get to know your heart... it could save your life.

#6 cheerioet

cheerioet

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 29 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 29 April 2009 - 05:30 AM

The original reference is: Bethesda Research Laboratories. 1986. BRL pUC host: E. coli DH5α competent cells. Focus 8(2):9. (see here). DH5α was derived from E. coli DH5, described in Hanahan, D. 1985. in DNA Cloning: A Practical Approach. Glover, D. M. (ed.), Vol. 1, p. 109, IRL Press, McLean, Virginia. "DH" are the initials of Doug Hanahan.


Wow...Now I know DH5alpha is named from someone initials. Thanks.

#7 hanming86

hanming86

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 156 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 29 April 2009 - 07:17 AM

Nice one Homebrew. I really appreciate that knowledge . D. Hanathan 5 ~~ this guy drives fast car and work late in the night mysteriously if i m not mistaken as written in Sambrook .
Lab + Coffee + Music = Bliss

#8 HomeBrew

HomeBrew

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 930 posts
15
Good

Posted 29 April 2009 - 04:59 PM

And all those highly competent E. coli cells you buy or make? He worked that out in D Hanahan. 1983. Studies on transformation of Escherichia coli with plasmids. J Mol Biol 166(4):557-580, which, by the way, is also from where we get SOB and SOC media.

#9 Ratna

Ratna

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 15 December 2009 - 06:44 PM

Hi Everyone!

It was interesting to read all your answers ;)

What could be its pathogenicity levels of this bacteria, is it BSL-2 pathogen? I was building a risk assessment form for this strain and came up with these questions.

Thank you

#10 phage434

phage434

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,375 posts
227
Excellent

Posted 15 December 2009 - 07:05 PM

DH5a and other common K-12 E. coli derivatives used in the lab are BSL-1, and non-pathogenic to normal healthy individuals. You should still use good lab practices in handling all bacterial samples, including autoclaving contaminated waste, bleaching discarded liquid cultures, and washing your hands.

#11 Ratna

Ratna

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 15 December 2009 - 09:45 PM

Thank you for your reply.

I have to attach the msds of the strain alongwith the form. I could not find the exact one on the internet.

Can you help me please?




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.