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Cladosporium versus Penicilium


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7 replies to this topic

#1 josse

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 03:23 AM

Hallo all,

I am plating out Cladosporium and Penicilium, both on SAB (Sabouraud dextrose agar) in roux bottles.
However when I want to count the spores I noticed that the Penicilium forms a lot of spores, the Cladosporium almost nothing.
Could this be due to the medium I use or is the Cladosporium just a slow "grower" ?
I do use glas beads to lossen the spores, maybe I should do it in a different way?

==>I have edited the post.

Edited by josse, 19 April 2009 - 04:02 AM.


#2 GeorgeWolff

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 03:51 AM

Not sure what you are trying to accomplish. Clostiridia are bacteria - obligate anaerobes. I doubt seriously if they'll grow under the conditions you describe and, even if you were to culture them appropriateky, you'd not see the spores.

#3 josse

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 04:03 AM

Not sure what you are trying to accomplish. Clostiridia are bacteria - obligate anaerobes. I doubt seriously if they'll grow under the conditions you describe and, even if you were to culture them appropriateky, you'd not see the spores.



I am sorry, I made a mistake: it was Cladosporium not Clostridia. I have no idea why I wrote Clostridia, probably still sleeping :rolleyes:
I have changed the topic.

#4 GeorgeWolff

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 01:32 PM

Cladosporium spp. produce a fair number of spores - conidia. Are the colonies typically pigmented?

Edited by GeorgeWolff, 19 April 2009 - 01:47 PM.


#5 gebirgsziege

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 10:14 PM

Hallo all,

I am plating out Cladosporium and Penicilium, both on SAB (Sabouraud dextrose agar) in roux bottles.
However when I want to count the spores I noticed that the Penicilium forms a lot of spores, the Cladosporium almost nothing.
Could this be due to the medium I use or is the Cladosporium just a slow "grower" ?
I do use glas beads to lossen the spores, maybe I should do it in a different way?

==>I have edited the post.


Which Cladosporium are you using? For Cladosporium you might try DG18 agar or Malt extract agar???? SAB is usually not the best choice for fungi (even if I know that it is widely used :) )

Why using roux bottles? I would grow in petri dish, use a weak detergent (eg. 0.01 % Tween) to wash off the sproes and then count them....this usually works fine for Penicillium and Cladosporium (and most other fungi)
A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies. (Oscar Wilde)

#6 josse

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 05:27 AM

Cladosporium spp. produce a fair number of spores - conidia. Are the colonies typically pigmented?


What do you mean with typically pigmented?

Which Cladosporium are you using? For Cladosporium you might try DG18 agar or Malt extract agar???? SAB is usually not the best choice for fungi (even if I know that it is widely used )

Why using roux bottles? I would grow in petri dish, use a weak detergent (eg. 0.01 % Tween) to wash off the sproes and then count them....this usually works fine for Penicillium and Cladosporium (and most other fungi)


Maybe its because of the medium yes.

and what Cladosporium I am using? no idea, they just told me that one sample is Cladosporium and the other Penicilium.
And the roux bottles? thats what they gave me.

#7 GeorgeWolff

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 12:42 PM

Cladospirium spp are dematiaceous fungi - they should be darkly pigmented (brown, greenish black).

#8 gebirgsziege

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 10:40 PM

and what Cladosporium I am using? no idea, they just told me that one sample is Cladosporium and the other Penicilium.
And the roux bottles? thats what they gave me.


Maybe you then should just ask your supervisor about some more details, they should know about the sporulation problem. Cladosporium needs app. 1 - 2 weeks to sporulate well.

A personal opinion to add: "they just told me" :ph34r: Every time I heard this sentence in the last years it was after some kind of (nearly) catastrophic event in the lab :) So please: if somebody gives me cultures never start working with them without knowing some basic facts.....keep in mind every micro-organism we do not know must be treated as if it is a potential danger for us and our environment! Even if Cladosporium and Penicillium are harmless (HG1), they have a very high allergenic potential. So think about what you are working with before going to the bench! This usually saves you a lot of trouble and work!!! [End personal opininon]

Edited by gebirgsziege, 20 April 2009 - 10:40 PM.

A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies. (Oscar Wilde)




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