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Waterless Water Baths?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 dabranch

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 05:12 PM

What can Bath Beads by LabArmor do?

Helps ensure cleaner experiments ...
Bead Baths keep things dry. By replacing water baths, Bead Baths ensure that your incubating samples are protected from water-borne contamination, which can result in distorted data and nonreproducible results.

... and lowers laboratory risks.
Open sources of water in the lab put you and the lab at risk of incubating and spreading biological or chemical contaminantion between samples, equipment, and people.

A Bead Bath performs all the essentials, including warming, thawing, incubating, chilling and does it while maintaining an constant temperature just like a water bath. But it performs a few additional things too.

-Always stays on.
-Remains clean and filled.
-Holds any type of vessel.
-Stays organized.
-Better temperature flexibility.

To Learn More Visit: www.labarmor.com

#2 Thapa

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Posted 15 April 2009 - 10:03 PM

cool
"Learning without thought is labor lost"

#3 Astilius

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 08:54 AM

Plant!


Anyway, isn't this a solution to a problem that doesn't exist?
Say I have a spill in my bath of beads - it'll either cost me $500 to throw them out and replace them or an absolute age to clean the contaminated beads.
Also, this will have lower contact area with the tubes - what's the thermal conductivity like and uniformity of heating?

Nah, this is an expensive, if cool looking, solution to a problem that's just not there.

Ah'm oot.[/Duncan Bannatyne]
To the last, I grapple with thee; from Hell's heart, I stab at thee; for hate's sake, I spit my last breath at thee.

#4 hobglobin

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 11:19 AM

We use a "sand bath", an old, leaking water bath with clean, sterilised quartz sand. Not bad for some experiments.
And they are also offered new by some companies . I guess sand has better heat transmission compared to beads.

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
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#5 dabranch

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 01:15 PM

Plant!


Anyway, isn't this a solution to a problem that doesn't exist?
Say I have a spill in my bath of beads - it'll either cost me $500 to throw them out and replace them or an absolute age to clean the contaminated beads.
Also, this will have lower contact area with the tubes - what's the thermal conductivity like and uniformity of heating?

Nah, this is an expensive, if cool looking, solution to a problem that's just not there.

Ah'm oot.[/Duncan Bannatyne]


Actually, the beads are designed in a kidney bean shape to allow more bead surface area to come in contact with the sample when it is inserted into the bead bath. So there is excellent contact area with the sample at any angle.

Plus, when it comes to cleaning you can just rinse them with mild soap and water...nothing hard...nothing costly.

DW

#6 dabranch

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 01:30 PM

We use a "sand bath", an old, leaking water bath with clean, sterilised quartz sand. Not bad for some experiments.
And they are also offered new by some companies . I guess sand has better heat transmission compared to beads.



The classic sand bath has some similar qualities to the bead bath, however, the Bath Beads by LabArmor have a superior rate of high efficiency thermal transfer when compared to sand, plus instrument burnout protection, and are mobile and field use compatible.

DW

#7 Minnie Mouse

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 04:52 PM

We use a "sand bath", an old, leaking water bath with clean, sterilised quartz sand. Not bad for some experiments.
And they are also offered new by some companies . I guess sand has better heat transmission compared to beads.



The classic sand bath has some similar qualities to the bead bath, however, the Bath Beads by LabArmor have a superior rate of high efficiency thermal transfer when compared to sand, plus instrument burnout protection, and are mobile and field use compatible.

DW


Have you done a test to compare the bead and the sand bath?

#8 dabranch

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 10:56 AM

Yes, the study was conducted by an independent lab (Sheldon Mfg.)


We use a "sand bath", an old, leaking water bath with clean, sterilised quartz sand. Not bad for some experiments.
And they are also offered new by some companies . I guess sand has better heat transmission compared to beads.



The classic sand bath has some similar qualities to the bead bath, however, the Bath Beads by LabArmor have a superior rate of high efficiency thermal transfer when compared to sand, plus instrument burnout protection, and are mobile and field use compatible.

DW


Have you done a test to compare the bead and the sand bath?



#9 mdfenko

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 08:17 AM

...plus instrument burnout protection...

how do the beads convey burnout protection?

how is it different from sand (re: burnout protection)?
talent does what it can
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i do what i get paid to do

#10 dabranch

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 04:04 PM

...plus instrument burnout protection...

how do the beads convey burnout protection?

how is it different from sand (re: burnout protection)?




Say someone left your water bath on overnight...the water would evaporate and your heating element would burnout- costing you several hundred dollars (sometimes thousands) to replace. On the other hand, same situation but instead of water you have the thermo-metallic Bath Beads by LabArmor beads which act as a heat sink to absorb and dissipate the heat...whereby lowering the temp of the heating element...preventing it from a burnout.

#11 mdfenko

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 06:26 AM

...plus instrument burnout protection...

how do the beads convey burnout protection?

how is it different from sand (re: burnout protection)?




Say someone left your water bath on overnight...the water would evaporate and your heating element would burnout- costing you several hundred dollars (sometimes thousands) to replace. On the other hand, same situation but instead of water you have the thermo-metallic Bath Beads by LabArmor beads which act as a heat sink to absorb and dissipate the heat...whereby lowering the temp of the heating element...preventing it from a burnout.

wouldn't sand offer the same protection?
talent does what it can
genius does what it must
i do what i get paid to do

#12 dabranch

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 03:37 PM

...plus instrument burnout protection...

how do the beads convey burnout protection?

how is it different from sand (re: burnout protection)?




Say someone left your water bath on overnight...the water would evaporate and your heating element would burnout- costing you several hundred dollars (sometimes thousands) to replace. On the other hand, same situation but instead of water you have the thermo-metallic Bath Beads by LabArmor beads which act as a heat sink to absorb and dissipate the heat...whereby lowering the temp of the heating element...preventing it from a burnout.

wouldn't sand offer the same protection?

Im sure sand would offer a degree of protection. However, I would consider sand an inferior heat sink. If you have ever taken a engineering course over thermal conductivity you will learn everything acts as a heat sink and an insulator. But all dense materials are not equal effective. A good heat sink material is something that absorbs heat and releases it quickly. Sand has a much lower thermal conductivity compared to the higher thermal conductivity of the metallic properties of the LabArmor Bath Bead, whereby making it the superior heat sink.

#13 bob1

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 05:10 PM

You could always buy a bath with an over-temperature cutout, ours work pretty well.

#14 dabranch

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 03:41 PM

You could always buy a bath with an over-temperature cutout, ours work pretty well.


You could, but buying LabArmor bath beads would be considerably less expensive than buying all new baths with temp cutouts. Saving money is good.

#15 bob1

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 05:32 PM

Our baths are 15 years old and still working fine with temperature cutouts.




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