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1.5% agar plate


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10 replies to this topic

#1 c0ok1e

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Posted 12 April 2009 - 11:08 PM

Im an amateur researcher and I just got into the mucrobiology field. Before this I was doing animal science. I hope to learn more about the basics and principles of microbiology. I have been trying to figure this out but couldnt get any information on the net. They didnt explain why..

I would like to know what is the reason behind researchers using 1.5% agar plate? What is the significance between 1.5% and other percentages? If we use 1% is there any difference?

#2 phage434

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 04:09 AM

This is strictly a matter of taste and convenience. 1% agar is a bit soft and is easy to tear with a loop. 1.5% agar has a harder surface. The choice may slightly change the morphology of colonies, so if this is an important phenotypic characteristic, it might matter. 1.5% is the "normal" choice.

#3 c0ok1e

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 04:44 AM

This is strictly a matter of taste and convenience. 1% agar is a bit soft and is easy to tear with a loop. 1.5% agar has a harder surface. The choice may slightly change the morphology of colonies, so if this is an important phenotypic characteristic, it might matter. 1.5% is the "normal" choice.


so there are no published paper on the different percentage of agar used?
Then it means that the hardness of agar varies from 1 - 1.5% are not so important right.. thanks..

#4 pito

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 07:56 AM

This is strictly a matter of taste and convenience. 1% agar is a bit soft and is easy to tear with a loop. 1.5% agar has a harder surface. The choice may slightly change the morphology of colonies, so if this is an important phenotypic characteristic, it might matter. 1.5% is the "normal" choice.


so there are no published paper on the different percentage of agar used?
Then it means that the hardness of agar varies from 1 - 1.5% are not so important right.. thanks..


you could find some papers on the subject.
Like:
1 or2 or 3 but how they got the 1.5% ? No idea, I guess trail and error? Someone found out that it was good to use 1.5% and well since then... I have no idea of an article is written on why 1.5%.. but maybe you could find some references in the texts I gave that refer to some older literature that speak about the 1.5% agar.

If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#5 c0ok1e

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 02:38 PM

This is strictly a matter of taste and convenience. 1% agar is a bit soft and is easy to tear with a loop. 1.5% agar has a harder surface. The choice may slightly change the morphology of colonies, so if this is an important phenotypic characteristic, it might matter. 1.5% is the "normal" choice.


so there are no published paper on the different percentage of agar used?
Then it means that the hardness of agar varies from 1 - 1.5% are not so important right.. thanks..


you could find some papers on the subject.
Like:
1 or2 or 3 but how they got the 1.5% ? No idea, I guess trail and error? Someone found out that it was good to use 1.5% and well since then... I have no idea of an article is written on why 1.5%.. but maybe you could find some references in the texts I gave that refer to some older literature that speak about the 1.5% agar.


ALright thanks.. Ill look into it... Maybe its not so important after all but I just like to know my work in detail...

#6 why

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 01:59 AM

Some of the commercial powdered-agar media come in 1.2% of agar, but we prefer to use harder agar so we add additional agar powder when preparing.

#7 housemusicanl

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 05:46 AM

amateur researcher = terrorist

#8 Jaff

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 02:54 AM

amateur researcher = terrorist


An agar terrorist??? Deciding factor on agar percentages...........budget!!!!

Edited by Jaff, 10 June 2009 - 02:55 AM.


#9 GeorgeWolff

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 01:28 PM

We're not allowed to ask questions of terrorists with reading their Miranda rights 1st.

#10 phage434

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 02:35 PM

It's well known that Real Terrorists ™ use sliced boiled potatoes as culture medium.
Nothing to worry about here.

#11 gebirgsziege

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 04:42 AM

It's well known that Real Terrorists ™ use sliced boiled potatoes as culture medium.
Nothing to worry about here.



Better worry about the breakfast terrorists using oatmeal!
A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies. (Oscar Wilde)




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