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How many of you doing research as a passion not for survial


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53 replies to this topic

#46 kottila

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 12:26 AM

How many of you really are doing research as a passion instead of for survival, and really believe what you are doing is going to solve some real problem. I believe over 90% of us will respond "no" including myself.


It used to be a passion, now it's a passion one day a week and something I have to get through the rest of the days.

#47 merlav

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 10:21 AM

For passion!!!, if were for survival I had studied other thing were I can earn more money.
Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.
Albert Einstein

I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale.
Marie Curie

#48 Ameya P

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 09:41 PM

Its passion... but I'm now in a semi-industrial set up, developing protocols and run routine samples. So when its development I love it and when there is routine work, I get bored. So right now, its survival, cause I would rather work here than anywhere else to make money and am taking small steps to the level called 'Passion', from where I would like to take off....

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#49 Optimistic

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 08:34 PM

For me,

Because i am doing my master's research, in cancer and cell death, i do not feel that i am doing it as survival OR even as a passion.
It seems like someone push me to do it and because of that i have been trying to push my self to feel that i have a passion which's by the end came up a real Obsession that i could not be able to remove it from my head.

Your Question such a knife stab me in my heart

#50 metaltemujin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:31 AM

It was passion first...then swings to survival... and now I don't know.
Splice is the scariest Bio-tech based movie ever. People, don't be like the character in it.

"Don't mate with your creations at least, nature has provided you with plenty of options"


My most used quote: "You are annoying..."
My most used scientific quote: "This is annoyingannoyingannoyingannoyingannoyingannoying.....

#51 Trof

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 12:59 AM

I do it for the passion. I'm curious and I think knowledge is the only thing that can really push the mankind to something better. Yet, as my PhD studentship is getting older and older (and I hope I will definitelly finish this year!) I'm realising that I may be forced to leave it someday for some better paid job. It's not about big money, it's about living normal modest life, not needing to worry if I have to buy a discount food, to have some money for my hobbies, for once-a-year vacation, for raising a future child. Still I'm not ready yet to leave this world of wonders and sights.
When looking for other options I'm thinking about maybe some company application support, helping to solve problems of others. I like to analyze and find the solution. It wouldn't be science though, but I would feel like I'm helping it in an indirect way.

Our country has a serious deficiency in lighthouses. I assume the main reason is that we have no sea.

I never trust anything that can't be doubted.

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#52 Inbox

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 05:43 AM

Hey sometime I think researcher in Mol. Bio. Lab are becoming more of Ecoli DH5 alpha strains. Surviving more comfortably in lab than outside. They must got to do it with or without passion.
So I would say its more of survival issue after certain time.

#53 ascacioc

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 07:29 AM

You are right: have you realized how weirder and weirder the people outside seem, the more you spend in your PhD/studies? Like, there was an EHEC crisis recently in Germany and I so-so loved telling people that I work with E. coli and I am just coming from the lab. Still wearing those clothes :D So funny to see their faces.

Or how annoying is to tell people that if they have a cold, it does not help to take antibiotics. Or things like my nutritionist told me... (mostly bullshit). Or I read in this newspaper (which highly paraphrased some press release from some institute written by a secretary) that scientists discovered... Or people that still don't believe in evolution. Those are the most difficult, it is like: trust me, I am a biologist. Do not try to comprehend things beyond you. Just take it as it is. .... And they do not take it. I mean: for crying out loud, I have a degree in this shit: I know better!!! yes I do!

Or have you noticed that lately the teenagers changed their clothing behavior: aka they are flashier and flashier and more and more make-up. In labs girls do not wear high-high heels (only medium-heels :) ) and no make-up (anyhow it goes over your face when you spend 12+ hours in the lab). I definitely would die outside like the E coli I bring outside the lab on my clothing from the beginning of this post.

Andreea

#54 Trof

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 12:23 PM

I'm the kind of person that other people look at and say "well, you know, those scientists.." always, however I'm not any kind of young experimentator, how came to the lab too small to work on the bench and do student projects on topics their teachers don't even understand. Well.. on the other hand.. in primary school I was all the years just waiting for the chemistry, because I've seen somewhere that chemists mix different couloured things and create other coloured things and explosions and other interesting stuff. We had a surplus beaker from some friends at home and I always thought it is SO cool. I collected old remnants of coloured soaps and planned to mix them and heat and see what will come aout of that (or maybe I even did that and was dissapointed).

Later parents bought me half-toy microscope (half toy since it had plastic, not glass lenses) and I was excited. But I didn't know on what to look, you know, knew nothing about cells probably and where to get any, solid objects were just black under the microskope. So I cut a part of sheer curtain which is thinn and..sheer, so now my parents were not excited.
Even later I got a better one, even with some brime shrimp eggs to grow, but somehow they didn't. I found now better specimen, but still soon nothing interesting was found arount to look at. Later I learned, that the main reason was, that this microscope has such horrible chromatic and possibly other abberations, that I wasn't able to see anything in colour, all colours seen were arteficial, the contrast was horrible and resolution too.

Now I got lost in my story.. ehm..anyway, I always was kind of vaguely interested in everything around, but never got to anyone who could lead me in those years, I heard about people doing student science projects in biology, but that meant like calculating the beatles in certain area or observing a snail or something. I'm obviously not that kind of biologist Posted Image
I only get molecular biology to focus when I heard the term for the first time. Our prominent biology teacher wrote "molecular biology" on the blackboard and said a definition of it. And at that moment I said to myself, I want to do this.

Also it came combined with my love of big cats. Years before I had a subscription to a childrens science magazine and there was an article about cheetahs. I love cheetahs... you can notice Posted Image The article was about the special kind of cheetah called "king cheetah", which was originaly thought to be a different species, but the article explained it's only a mutation.
There was a schematics of "something" inherited from each parent, and which combination can or cannot make a king cheetah (didn't know it then, but it's a autosomal recessive trait). Of course I didn't get it, at all, since there were two patches of fur representing two alleles but I didn't know about pair of genes and alleles so I only saw two patches in every individual and couldn't understand why on the earth are there two. But I get that genetics must be really something interesting. And cheetahs.

So to conclude, I'm simply doing what I was always meant to do, though I got to that only bit later in life. I'm pretty happy in my niche and with my lifestyle :)
You know being a scientist carries a lot of social excuses, I like to exploit that sometimes Posted Image

(and sorry for the long post)

Our country has a serious deficiency in lighthouses. I assume the main reason is that we have no sea.

I never trust anything that can't be doubted.

'Normal' is a dryer setting. - Elizabeth Moon





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