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Liquid and solid autoclave


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18 replies to this topic

#1 Lupo Comunitario

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 05:13 AM

Hi everybody.
I have a basic question that maybe I should be ashamed to ask:
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Why liquids and solids have to be autoclaved separately?

Fabio

#2 mdfenko

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 06:59 AM

you can autoclave solids with liquid cycle but you can't autoclave liquids with solid cycle.

solid cycle vents rapidly. the liquids will boil over.

liquid cycle vents gradually. this helps prevent boiling.
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#3 Minnie Mouse

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 02:59 PM

Normally, I autoclave buffer and tip boxes together using liquid cycle.

#4 pito

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 07:31 AM

you can autoclave solids with liquid cycle but you can't autoclave liquids with solid cycle.

solid cycle vents rapidly. the liquids will boil over.

liquid cycle vents gradually. this helps prevent boiling.



Could you define what you mean by liquid cycle and solid cycle? (time.. etc..)

I always use the same protocol to autoclave, I have no idea if it a "solid" cycle or a "liquid" cycle.

We do "open" the bottles with liquids a bit so that the pressure can go out the bottle.

Or are you using some sort of special autoclave ?

Edited by pito, 01 April 2009 - 10:19 AM.

If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#5 lab rat

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 12:33 PM

Pito,

Many autoclaves have settings for different types of items: liquids, unwrapped items, wrapped items, etc.

Liquid settings will vent slowly, to avoid boilover.
Unwrapped settings will vent quickly.
Wrapped settings will vent quickly, and have a drying cycle at the end.

Older autoclaves may not have these settings (?) All the autoclaves that we use have digital screens and pre-programmed settings.

Does this help?

Lab rat
42..."An immutable fixed-precision number of unlimited magnitude." <a href="http://en.wikipedia....amming_language)" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia....amming_language)</a>, accessed 25June2009.

#6 praveensbio

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 11:50 PM

liquid cycle is the best one to choose either it may be only liquids or only solids or with a combination..........
In our lab the autoclave is set to only liquid cycle and it is not adjusted in any case and it works pretty fine......
the reason for the solid cycle is that as already mentioned due drying cycle and prolonged duration liquids may evaporate and change there composition.............. :lol:

#7 Minnie Mouse

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 01:07 PM

I would autoclave solid (tips boxes and eppendorf) and liquid (buffers) together using liquid cycle, rather than separate them and run two different cycles.

It would help to reduce greenhouse gases.

#8 GeorgeWolff

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 05:08 PM

They can be autolcaved together.

#9 pito

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 05:07 AM

Pito,

Many autoclaves have settings for different types of items: liquids, unwrapped items, wrapped items, etc.

Liquid settings will vent slowly, to avoid boilover.
Unwrapped settings will vent quickly.
Wrapped settings will vent quickly, and have a drying cycle at the end.

Older autoclaves may not have these settings (?) All the autoclaves that we use have digital screens and pre-programmed settings.

Does this help?

Lab rat



Ah I see, thats what I was thinking: you are all speaking about new types of autoclaves :)

Well I still use an old autoclave, there is nothing really to select :D
You just swith it on and wait untill the pressure is high enough and then you close it , wait 20 minutes, release the pressure and done :rolleyes:

If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#10 mdfenko

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 12:09 PM

i was using autoclaves 35+ years ago (and they were old then) and they all had liquid and dry cycles.

the only problem with autoclaving solids (dry) with liquid cycle is that the wrappers sometimes came out damp or wet.
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#11 pito

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 03:19 AM

i was using autoclaves 35+ years ago (and they were old then) and they all had liquid and dry cycles.

the only problem with autoclaving solids (dry) with liquid cycle is that the wrappers sometimes came out damp or wet.


Really?
I havent got any setting to be decided. However you can indeed decide how fast you let the pressure go by turning the vial less or more open, but still, thats not really a specific setting.

Like said: on and off button and thats it :P

Edited by pito, 04 April 2009 - 04:25 AM.

If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#12 josse

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 04:25 AM

How would you guys keep your tips for the pipettes dry when autoclaving them.
We put aluminum foil around the boxes, but I think this is a waste of foil.

Arent there any alternatives?

#13 lab rat

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 09:08 AM

How would you guys keep your tips for the pipettes dry when autoclaving them.
We put aluminum foil around the boxes, but I think this is a waste of foil.

Arent there any alternatives?



Hi Josse,

Yes, that's a waste of foil. Just put the tips in a glassware oven after autoclaving, and they'll dry.

regards,

lab rat
42..."An immutable fixed-precision number of unlimited magnitude." <a href="http://en.wikipedia....amming_language)" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia....amming_language)</a>, accessed 25June2009.

#14 pito

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 01:33 AM

How would you guys keep your tips for the pipettes dry when autoclaving them.
We put aluminum foil around the boxes, but I think this is a waste of foil.

Arent there any alternatives?



Hi Josse,

Yes, that's a waste of foil. Just put the tips in a glassware oven after autoclaving, and they'll dry.

regards,

lab rat


I have done it with aluminum foil too: if you do not use aluminum foil, they stay wet for too long.
It is indeed a waste.
But arent there special bags to use instead of aluminim foil?

If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#15 perneseblue

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 03:09 AM

How would you guys keep your tips for the pipettes dry when autoclaving them.
We put aluminum foil around the boxes, but I think this is a waste of foil.

Arent there any alternatives?


Hi Josse,
Yes, that's a waste of foil. Just put the tips in a glassware oven after autoclaving, and they'll dry.

regards,

lab rat


In my former department, we placed our wet autoclaved tip boxes into a heated drying cabinet. It took a while but the boxes come out dry the next morning
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