Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

error in storage temperature of antibodies


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 yobou

yobou

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 89 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:44 PM

Dar All
some antibodies (containing sodium azide as a preservative) that should be stored at 4-8 oC were stored by mistake at -20oC for 24 hrs. Should this spoil them?
thanks

#2 klinmed

klinmed

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 209 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 13 March 2009 - 11:01 PM

Dar All
some antibodies (containing sodium azide as a preservative) that should be stored at 4-8 oC were stored by mistake at -20oC for 24 hrs. Should this spoil them?
thanks


Absolutely no problem.
For long-term storage antibodies are often stored at -20 oC. One thing they do not like is MULTIPLE freeze/thaw cycles.
Just thaw your reagents, mix them gently, and store them at 4 oC, or in aliquots at -20 oC.
Hope this helps

#3 yobou

yobou

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 89 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 13 March 2009 - 11:13 PM

I am worried because the manufacturer stated that (avoid freezing)

#4 klinmed

klinmed

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 209 posts
1
Neutral

Posted 13 March 2009 - 11:24 PM

I am worried because the manufacturer stated that (avoid freezing)


The only potential problem could occur if your antibodies are IgM monoclonals. These are not commonly used because they have a tendency to aggregate especially after freezing. If you are using polyclonals or IgG monoclonals I am pretty sure they will be fine. If you are REALLY worried you can always contact the manufacturer. Why not just try them. Am sure they will be fine

#5 mdfenko

mdfenko

    an elder

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,710 posts
123
Excellent

Posted 16 March 2009 - 11:29 AM

it could also be a problem if the antibody is conjugated to an enzyme (a secondary antibody). the enzyme may be sensitive to freezing.

the only way you will know for sure is to use the antibody and compare the result with the result from before freezing.
talent does what it can
genius does what it must
i do what i get paid to do




Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.