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Difference between: Different shapes of 96 well plate bottoms


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9 replies to this topic

#1 facris

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 11:11 AM

Hello, this post is basically as the title suggests. I'm working on a human prostate cancer cell line (DU145). This cell line forms a monolayer on the bottom of a plate so i'm thinking maybe there may be effects if i pick different shapes for the wells in my 96 well plates. Does anyone know the reason behind, or use of:

Flat-Bottomed
Round-Bottomed
V-Bottomed

Also we've been ordering our plates from Corning, is there better suppliers or is Corning the common place to get these. Thanks in advance -Brad

#2 scolix

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 11:54 AM

As far I have seen, Flat ones are almost always used for cell culture, other types for different types of assays depending on machines requirements.eg. some RTpcr or ELISA machines require certain type of bottom wells.

#3 klinmed

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 04:49 AM

Flat bottomed plates are the most commonly used microplate in cell culture. Round-bottomed ones are useful when cell-cell interactions are important, as the allow a loose cell pellet to form at the bottom of the well. Examples are T-cell/antigen presenting cell interactions in T-cell cloning, or T-cell mediated cytotoxicity assays. V-well plates are useful when combined with a plate centrifuge for obtaining tight cell pellets. This permits resuspension and washing of multiple cell cultures.

Hope this helps

#4 labrat612

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 08:05 AM

for adherent cell lines, flat bottomed 96 well plates would be best.
We've always gotten ours from Corning, however, I've started using ones from BD and found those to be just as good.


~labrat

#5 shs

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 05:01 PM

Flat bottom is the standard for cell culture
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#6 gfischer

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 07:44 AM

Nalgene/Nunc also makes good plates for culture.
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#7 Buffonidae

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 07:08 AM

Does anyone know which are best for microplate readers? Specifically for readings light at the 596 nm range, or thereabouts. Also, would it matter if the microplate reader was doing so for cells, versus a solution of proteins and chemicals?

#8 bob1

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 04:44 PM

Typically flat ones for plate readers, especially if you are doing absorbence readings. For fluorescence, it will depend on what sort of optics you have - top optics will read from the top of the plate, so the top has to be clear, but again bottom optics will need clear (and preferably flat).

#9 Lazinase

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 10:27 PM

Corning also has one called "low evaporation"...how about that one?

#10 shane

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 09:44 PM

Round-bottomed ones are helpful when cell-cell interactions are significant, as the permit a loose cell pellet to pattern at the base of the well. Examples are T-cell/antigen giving cell interactions in T-cell cloning, or T-cell mediated cytotoxicity assays




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