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57 replies to this topic

#16 casandra

casandra

    carpe diem by the jugulum

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 01:18 PM

welcome to bioforum, refugee clickpopclick....hope you enjoy your stay here.......you can join the mle in the tech forums way up the page or anytime you wanna just hang out- visit the peaceful community subforums way below (that's where the nicest people are) :P....btw, what's up with your display name?


Thanks!

It's been my handle for quite some time, and it's easier to remember the one name than a billion on all the sites where I have to come up with a user name. I like onomatopoeia.

And, hey, eppendorf tubes make that noise, don't they? It's universally identifiable! :D

but only the cheap ones- those that you'd need all your fingers for popping open the caps...or perhaps those that you left too long in the heating block--oops....:unsure:

-nice handle btw- does it come with an arrow or a cross? you're getting a kind of test here ....(only for the brave and the shameless...)
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#17 Adam L. Bishop

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 11:06 AM

Hi I am a college student right now and I love biology specifically ecology. The reason I joined this forum was to get ideas for a study I guess you could say that I want to set up. I want to be a zoo veterinarian. I am from Nebraska and I am a Biology student at Franciscan University in Steubenville, OH. just by looking through the site I realize how useful this will be to my growth and understanding of Biology.

#18 Adam L. Bishop

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 11:20 AM

I don't know where else to put this but I want to start building an ecosystem at my house I would eventually like it to be self-supporting. I realize this would be a pretty tough task unless I integrated the natural ecosystem that was already there but I would really like to contain my eco-system so as to not throw off the environment. I am planning a water feature with an aquatic self-supporting ecosystem which shouldn't be too hard. I don't exactly know what a realistic size is but I am guessing that the larger the animals in the sub environment, the more space they would need due to the laws of thermodynamics. My goal here is to set up a food web which I can study and manipulate to see the effects. I know I need producers first of all and then consumers. I would like 4 trophic levels unless that would be too much Ill obviously slowly introduce new levels and let each level stabilize before I move to the next level. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated

#19 lab rat

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 11:21 AM

Hey, Adam, welcome.
42..."An immutable fixed-precision number of unlimited magnitude." <a href="http://en.wikipedia....amming_language)" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia....amming_language)</a>, accessed 25June2009.

#20 hobglobin

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 11:24 AM

I don't know where else to put this but I want to start building an ecosystem at my house I would eventually like it to be self-supporting. I realize this would be a pretty tough task unless I integrated the natural ecosystem that was already there but I would really like to contain my eco-system so as to not throw off the environment. I am planning a water feature with an aquatic self-supporting ecosystem which shouldn't be too hard. I don't exactly know what a realistic size is but I am guessing that the larger the animals in the sub environment, the more space they would need due to the laws of thermodynamics. My goal here is to set up a food web which I can study and manipulate to see the effects. I know I need producers first of all and then consumers. I would like 4 trophic levels unless that would be too much Ill obviously slowly introduce new levels and let each level stabilize before I move to the next level. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated

Welcome and good luck, hopefully you're at top of the food web :)

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#21 casandra

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 11:28 AM

I don't know where else to put this but I want to start building an ecosystem at my house I would eventually like it to be self-supporting. I realize this would be a pretty tough task unless I integrated the natural ecosystem that was already there but I would really like to contain my eco-system so as to not throw off the environment. I am planning a water feature with an aquatic self-supporting ecosystem which shouldn't be too hard. I don't exactly know what a realistic size is but I am guessing that the larger the animals in the sub environment, the more space they would need due to the laws of thermodynamics. My goal here is to set up a food web which I can study and manipulate to see the effects. I know I need producers first of all and then consumers. I would like 4 trophic levels unless that would be too much Ill obviously slowly introduce new levels and let each level stabilize before I move to the next level. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated


Hi Adam and welcome to Bioforum...your very own ecosystem, wow....what animals do you have in mind? I guess bears are out of the question...:)...
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#22 Adam L. Bishop

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 03:01 PM

I don't know where else to put this but I want to start building an ecosystem at my house I would eventually like it to be self-supporting. I realize this would be a pretty tough task unless I integrated the natural ecosystem that was already there but I would really like to contain my eco-system so as to not throw off the environment. I am planning a water feature with an aquatic self-supporting ecosystem which shouldn't be too hard. I don't exactly know what a realistic size is but I am guessing that the larger the animals in the sub environment, the more space they would need due to the laws of thermodynamics. My goal here is to set up a food web which I can study and manipulate to see the effects. I know I need producers first of all and then consumers. I would like 4 trophic levels unless that would be too much Ill obviously slowly introduce new levels and let each level stabilize before I move to the next level. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated


Hi Adam and welcome to Bioforum...your very own ecosystem, wow....what animals do you have in mind? I guess bears are out of the question...:lol:...



Well I want to start out with only plants and i am assuming various insects will join the habitat after the plants, after a year I think I will try to introduce some mice and a few hedgehogs and if I can get my hands on two sugar gliders I would be very happy. I haven't thought much further than that I really don't want snakes involved so I was trying to think of a predator that wouldn't even think of attacking me it would be neat to get some small primates in there eventually. Maybe I'll just stick to three levels for awhile. i have a feeling this is only gonna work with a lot of trial and error.

#23 comet.Angel

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 12:45 AM

hi! im a BS bio grad but never had a working experience in the lab for the past 13yrs. :-) but now im back in the laboratory and research work. I cant believe that my enthutiasm working on experiments still there. Though, i need a lot of catching up to do but it doesnt matter for as long as i enjoy what i do.

this site is really helpful to beginners like me and i noticed that most of you here are very energetic and cool.

im glad to be a part of bioforum.

#24 LostintheLab

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 04:17 PM

Hello Comet.angel

Welcome in...feel free to join in the general craziness of the chat thread or use as you like :rolleyes:

Lost in the lab
I knew it! I knew it! Well, not in the sense of having the slightest idea, but I knew there was something I didn't know.

#25 casandra

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 05:42 PM

oh, you beat me to it, Lost-san. I wonder if we shld give Comet angel "the" test...:rolleyes:...welcome to Bioforum, a cool place for the coolest people....
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#26 comet.Angel

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 09:40 PM

@casandra---- i wonder what's 'the' test all about? hmmmmmmmm

#27 Prep!

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Posted 30 April 2010 - 09:59 PM

hey casey... comet is already tensed (thinkin about it if not anything else) about the test!!! why scare the new joinees :D
welcome to the forum comet!!

Edited by Prep!, 30 April 2010 - 10:02 PM.

Support bacteria - They are the only culture some people have!!!
Cheers!!!

#28 casandra

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 11:03 AM

@casandra---- i wonder what's 'the' test all about? hmmmmmmmm


:P..it's a trial by fire, comet.angel....and only for the brave (or the crazy)....actually, it's just a series of questions and answers....are you in? Would you dare? Then you'd see how really energetic and cool we are...

@PI: you can continue playing the good cop.....:D

Edited by casandra, 01 May 2010 - 11:13 AM.

"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#29 Prep!

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 10:01 PM

yeah wen the saviour turns the destroyer.. tere has to be an alternative!!! :)
Support bacteria - They are the only culture some people have!!!
Cheers!!!

#30 acetylcholine

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 11:43 AM

Why hello there.

I am an undergrad in neuroscience. I'm looking to get my PhD and do neurogenetics.




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