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Ultra-centrifugation


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5 replies to this topic

#1 lupe

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 03:07 PM

Hi everyone!
Does anybody know how much aerosol particles are liberated in ultra-centrifugation? There's any particle number, from above which normal centrifugation is considered ultra-centrifugation?
Thanks.

#2 mdfenko

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:23 AM

ultracentrifugation is normally performed under vacuum so i would expect no aerosols.

but

i wouldn't expect aerosols from any other centrifugation either (unless a tube leaks or breaks).
talent does what it can
genius does what it must
i do what i get paid to do

#3 klinmed

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 06:02 AM

Ultracentrifugation is undertaken in a chamber under vacuum and for this reason the sample tubes are sealed. With vertical and angle rotors heat-sealed tubes are used, Swinging rotors rely on tube holders that have a lid with an O-ring seal. Thus it is unlikely that aerosols will be generated. With hazardous samples, rotors/tube holders should be opened in a biosafety cabinet (just in case of a leak/tube rupture).
Bench centrifuges ALWAYS produce some aerosol. With hazardous samples, tubes should be spun in sealed tube carriers (available from most manufacturers). The carriers are again opened in a safety cabinet.

Work safely!

#4 molgen

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 08:43 AM

How dos Ultracentrifugation now a days?
For what reason do you want to do Ultracentrifugation?
Ultracentrifugation tacks days!!!
Caesium is so hard to come by.
You can do almost everything faster and cheaper in different methods.

#5 perneseblue

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 09:37 AM

How dos Ultracentrifugation now a days?
For what reason do you want to do Ultracentrifugation?
Ultracentrifugation tacks days!!!
Caesium is so hard to come by.
You can do almost everything faster and cheaper in different methods.


separating proteins from lipids in xenopus oocytes. Getting a pure preparation of intact BACs in the >100kb range.
May your PCR products be long, your protocols short and your boss on holiday

#6 klinmed

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 03:05 AM

How dos Ultracentrifugation now a days?
For what reason do you want to do Ultracentrifugation?
Ultracentrifugation tacks days!!!
Caesium is so hard to come by.
You can do almost everything faster and cheaper in different methods.



Who uses ultracentrifugation these days?

Scientists who want to:

1) Purify or concentrate virus
2) Fractionate subcellular organelles
3) Biophysically characterize protein structure
4) Fractionate lipoprotein complexes
5) Remove aggregates from antibodies that will be used clinically
6) etc etc

Have used all the above in the 21st century!
I assume you are talking about nucleic acid purification. Then, in general, I must agree. However, ultracentrifugation is still an important tool in biomedical research.




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