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The definition of a real gene?


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3 replies to this topic

#1 eleceyes

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Posted 20 February 2005 - 11:49 AM

Here is a rather broad question:
how do I know whether a 'gene' is a 'real gene'? (I have checked whether it appeared in the EST database) Whatelse needs to be done to be sure that it is a real gene?

thanks millions in advance!

#2 george@CASE

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Posted 20 February 2005 - 08:26 PM

the definition of gene is ever-changing. I don't know what the gold standard of a gene is today, but I think if it gets transcribed, then its a gene (accounts for rRNAs and tRNAs which never become translated).

#3 phantom

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Posted 22 February 2005 - 03:24 PM

Hi,
There have been zillions of discussions over what a comprehensive definition of a "real" gene can be. It is kind of a tough question though it sounds so elementary. A basic unit of heredity, that encodes a product or even codes for just RNA like rRNA or tRNA that do not end up as proteins, with 5' and 3' UTRs, with intervening sequences in eukaryotes.

Thanks,

Phantom

#4 sharath

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Posted 26 February 2005 - 06:41 AM

I believe yu are trying to see if your gene is an ORF. Then check your sequence for a promoter, start codon and a stop codon. If you can find them, then its a coding DNA; a gene, DNA portion with a property.
Sharath B.




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