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The SODIUM POTASSIUM pump


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#1 biologygeek

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Posted 09 January 2005 - 02:57 PM

what is the function of the sodium potassium pump? when does it function?

#2 george@CASE

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 02:43 PM

Na+/K+ is the most common ATP-fueled pump in the body. It uses up ATP to transport Na+ to the outside of the cell, and K+ inside. What you get is an imbalance of ions, which manifests as the membrane potential. This gradient is then used by other pumps to drive antiport transporters or co-transporters.

Membrane depolarization is extremely essential for neuron function as this imbalance is used to generate action potentials. I am not exactly sure but I think for neurons, 1/3 of ATP consumption goes to the maintenance of the Na+/K+ imbalance via Na+/K+ pumps.




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