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Fungus ID Request

fungus sputum

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#1 RodC

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 08:14 AM

This is a digital image taken from my microscope of an organism in a sample of sputum. It looks to me like fungus, do you know what type of fungus it is.? If not, do you know where I can find the answer.

 

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#2 bob1

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 08:35 PM

Crystals of some sort of salt - not a fungus at all. Most likely caused by a solution drying on the surface of the slide or on the coverslip.



#3 RodC

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 06:07 AM

Thanks for your help, it's appreciated.



#4 RodC

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 11:36 AM

I've attached clearer images taken from a different sputum sample but from the same source. It may be a completely different type of thing but it does look similar. Here it looks more organic than crystal.

The slide and microscope were clean before I put the sticky sputum on the slide. Interestingly when the sputum dried on the slide the structure of this growth was visible to the naked eye and the area of sputum was full of them.

Has anyone got any new ideas?

 

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#5 bob1

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 11:59 AM

The branch-like structures are salt crystals growing off the long object - if you can see it forming while you watch, it will almost never be a biological growth.

As to the long object, this could be any number of things, including debris from the cells in the lung, material that was in the mouth of the subject who provided the sample, hair (e.g. nasal)... etc.

#6 RodC

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 11:28 AM

I'm convinced, thanks. Human tears where almost an exact match in a Google images search.







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