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Why meoisis needs chromosome replication?


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#1 mr02077

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Posted 14 September 2018 - 05:29 AM

Hi. I am a mathematician who just likes reading on molecular biology.

My question is:
why does meiosis needs chromosomes replication in S phase? Why would not it have been developed through evolution, for example, just to do recombination between homologous chromosomes right away and split the recombined chromosomes to get two haploid cells?

Meosis is uniform in the way it functions for all multicellulals, where it is used, so it must be that the current process details are advantegous to other combinations.

One benefit I would see is production of more gametes, which deals with two-fold cost of sex better. But again, the cell could be replicating genes for 2 or more times, in meiosis, to be even more efficient, but only this unique model with single replication is ubiqutous.
What are the exact benefits of it?

I hope you understand my question well. Thank you for helping

Edited by mr02077, 14 September 2018 - 07:28 AM.


#2 pito

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Posted 14 September 2018 - 11:39 AM

Hi. I am a mathematician who just likes reading on molecular biology.

My question is:
why does meiosis needs chromosomes replication in S phase? Why would not it have been developed through evolution, for example, just to do recombination between homologous chromosomes right away and split the recombined chromosomes to get two haploid cells?

Meosis is uniform in the way it functions for all multicellulals, where it is used, so it must be that the current process details are advantegous to other combinations.

One benefit I would see is production of more gametes, which deals with two-fold cost of sex better. But again, the cell could be replicating genes for 2 or more times, in meiosis, to be even more efficient, but only this unique model with single replication is ubiqutous.
What are the exact benefits of it?

I hope you understand my question well. Thank you for helping

Not sure what you mean, but you say that it is rather strange to have a duplication (followed by the meiosis) rather than not have duplication and just have the homologues split?


If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#3 mr02077

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Posted 15 September 2018 - 01:43 AM

The duplication is a part of the meiosis, but you are right, the question is: why would not it do homologous recombination in a diploid cell and do the split to two haploid gametes?

Edited by mr02077, 15 September 2018 - 02:09 AM.


#4 pito

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Posted 15 September 2018 - 12:36 PM

The duplication is a part of the meiosis, but you are right, the question is: why would not it do homologous recombination in a diploid cell and do the split to two haploid gametes?

It is not really "part of" the meiosis. It happens before it, another phase, but yeah,you say it is part of it.

 

Why not just homologues recombination in a diploid cell and then split?

very simple: you have less "shuffling" of genes if you do it like that.

The fact that you have 2 divisions will generate more differences! 

You mix the genetic material more like this.


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#5 Trof

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 06:48 AM

I think the cell division might just be so linked to replication, that it is required for meiosis as well.The centromere organization and all the spindle aparatus required to make a cell division precise would be difficult to form on a haploid chromosome, where is naturaly not formed.


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