Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

peptide concentation clearification


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 samita

samita

    Veteran

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 150 posts
6
Neutral

Posted 07 June 2017 - 12:51 AM

I have a peptide 10ug/ul and its size is 1970 daltons (g/mol), and its molar concentation will be 5mM...can you explain me how.

 

conc = mass/molar mass

 

10ug/ul is the same as 10g/L

 

10g/L   /  1970 g/mol

 

so the concentration is  5mM in 1L and it means it will be 5nm/ul, but the calculator shows its 5mM in 1ul?? 

 

I dont understand the concept



#2 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,363 posts
509
Excellent

Posted 07 June 2017 - 06:00 AM

It is because mM is a concentration - if you write it out in full it is written as "millimoles per litre" this does not change based on volume; the concentration is constant.  When you are looking at things like this, it is important to make sure that what you are looking at is correct in terms of units. For instance in the sentence:

 

so the concentration is  5mM in 1L and it means it will be 5nm/ul, but the calculator shows its 5mM in 1ul?? 

You switch from concentration (mM) to amount (nm) - these are not equivalent mM is a concentration, always indicating amount per litre, and nm is an amount (nanomoles)

 

The question you are wanting to ask is "how many moles in 1 ul?" In which case you are correct, there should be about 5 nmole in 1 ul.






Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.