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Selection of clones during transfection


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4 replies to this topic

#1 utsavi

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Posted 20 August 2004 - 01:04 AM

Hi , ;)

How should one can decide the optimal concentration of geneticin to select a clone during stable transfection if it's not known at what concn. cells will die.

#2 Simonsays

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Posted 20 August 2004 - 08:04 AM

In our lab, we use 0.8mg of G418 (geneticin) per ml of medium for selection, and we lower that to 0.4mg/ml to maintain the selective pressure after that. We work aon the HEK model. I don't know though if the same concentrations apply to other types of cell.

Hope I could help!

Simon ;)

#3 kant0008

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Posted 22 August 2004 - 10:04 PM

Hi,
can you find out at what concentration cells will die? Construct a kill curve? It takes about 2weeks.
Otherwise 0.4-0.8mg/ml seems to be the range for most cell lines I use

#4 utsavi

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Posted 29 August 2004 - 10:48 PM

Thanx for the response U have given to me.

But, these cells I'm working with are very sensitive, so can I start with 50ug/ml concn.But then my worry is Cells may loose the transfected DNA if selection pressure is too low. :)

#5 kant0008

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Posted 29 August 2004 - 11:08 PM

Hello again,
if you say your cells are sensitive then you can start with a low concentration of antibiotic. Theoretically for a sensitive cell line a small amount of it should still be enough to maintain a selective pressure. You can always run a control non-transfected well, to make sure you are not getting random mutants. If you have the option I'd still try a kill curve, it might actually save you time and cells in the long run.
Good luck!




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