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Steady-state, ex vivo etc.

What these terms mean?

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3 replies to this topic

#1 Paja

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 09:04 AM

Hi,
I am looking for the proper term that would describe condition when I measure situation (expression of mRNA, production of proteins, etc.) e.g. in peripheral blood specimen or other tissue biopted (gained from biopsy). I think it is not "in vivo", but it is believed to mirror the real in vivo situation in the body. I used to use the therm "ex vivo" but I was told this is not correct, and another colleague adviced me to use the term "steady-state" which is hard to even translate and understand for me. Would anyone help me please? icon_smile.gif
Thanks,
Paja



#2 bob1

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 12:52 PM

Ex-vivo isn't the proper term as this is usually considered to be where you take a sample from an individual and then grow it (e.g. growing biopsy samples to create a cell line). Steady-state wouldn't apply either, as this would mean an unchanging condition. The term you are looking for isn't covered by the commonly used terms, so there might not be a short way of covering it without explanation.

 

However, the experiments you are performing on the samples are in-vitro experiments, which you could use if you said something like this: "In-vitro experiments were performed on samples taken from patient biopsies."



#3 Paja

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 03:49 PM

Ex-vivo isn't the proper term as this is usually considered to be where you take a sample from an individual and then grow it (e.g. growing biopsy samples to create a cell line). Steady-state wouldn't apply either, as this would mean an unchanging condition. The term you are looking for isn't covered by the commonly used terms, so there might not be a short way of covering it without explanation.

 

However, the experiments you are performing on the samples are in-vitro experiments, which you could use if you said something like this: "In-vitro experiments were performed on samples taken from patient biopsies."

Hi Bob,

Thank you very much for your reply. Nevertheless, I do not think the term in vitro suits my needs, because I do quantification of mRNA from blood cells directly gained from blood specimen, and simultaneously, part of the blood cell I do culture first and study effect of various stimulating factors - this one is in vitro for sure. I need to distinguish the measuring mRNA in blood cells immediately after blood collection/RNA isolation, from the RNA quantification after several days cultivation of those cells in Petri dish under some experimental condition...



#4 bob1

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 03:22 AM

In that case you could use "In vitro experiments were performed on samples taken from patient biopsies and on samples cultivated ex-vivo from the same biopsies."






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