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Why does paper fluoresce after addition of ethidium bromide

Paper Ethidium Bromide

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#1 Prasadiit

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 10:25 PM

When I image wet chromatography paper in a gel-doc, the intensity is not much. When I add a drop of ethidium  bromide in water (0.5 ug/ml) on this paper, it gives a high intensity. Washing the paper with water does not really decrease the intensity.The same ethidium bromide solution, when imaged in a PCR tube, gives little intensity.  It is clear that what I am seeing is not just paper's autofluorescence. It looks like EtBr binds strongly to cellulose. (1) Does anyone know if this is the case and why? (2) Is there a way to quench the fluroscence of EtBr on paper? Any help will be much appreciated. Thanks a lot.

 

Prasad

 



#2 phage434

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 06:01 AM

If you simply need to avoid the fluorescence (as opposed to understanding it) then you could use a membrane (PVDF e.g.). I'd be surprised if your "cellulose" does not have substantial amounts of DNA present.



#3 Prasadiit

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 10:08 PM

Thank you for your reply. There is definitely no DNA. From what you say, does PVDF membrane block all kind of fluroscence? 







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