Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

Would someone help me discuss what work can I do with laryngeal cancer cell hep2


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 GeorgeZB

GeorgeZB

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 07 May 2014 - 07:38 PM

I am new. I want to begin with laryngeal cancer cell line hep2 cells. Would someone please tell me something about it?

#2 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,728 posts
399
Excellent

Posted 07 May 2014 - 08:35 PM

A quick google search will tell you quite a bit about it... it is a HeLa derivative - so not laryngeal at all.  The ATCC has some good information.



#3 GeorgeZB

GeorgeZB

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 07 May 2014 - 10:18 PM

I got it. Thank bob1 very much. Another question, if I could harvest laryngeal cancer cells directly from the fresh specimen, or will it be better for me to buy laryngeal cancer cells from biotech firms? Is the result better accepted with purchased cell line?

#4 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,728 posts
399
Excellent

Posted 08 May 2014 - 02:23 AM

Either is acceptable, in many ways primary cells are actually a better choice than commercial lines, as establishment of a line means that it has (probably) undergone a number of changes that make it amenable to cell culture.

 

Having said that, primary culture can be difficult and is time consuming.



#5 Tabaluga

Tabaluga

    Making glass out of shards

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 394 posts
49
Excellent

Posted 08 May 2014 - 03:12 AM

Agree with Bob and I'd go for primary culture if it's possible; in many cases primary cultures are a better reflection/approximation of the actual in vivo situation than commercial cell lines.


Il dort. Quoique le sort fût pour lui bien étrange,
Il vivait. Il mourut quand il n'eut plus son ange;
La chose simplement d'elle-même arriva,
Comme la nuit se fait lorsque le jour s'en va.

 


#6 GeorgeZB

GeorgeZB

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 08 May 2014 - 03:44 PM

Thank you all! As I'm a green hand at cell cultivation, starting with commercial cell lines might be easier for me. I searched google and pubmed, and I got HLaC'79, HLaC'82, and HNO258, but with few articles. 

Looking forward to further disscussion~



#7 Tabaluga

Tabaluga

    Making glass out of shards

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 394 posts
49
Excellent

Posted 09 May 2014 - 12:20 PM

Check if the cell lines you're interested in are available at the ATCC http://www.lgcstanda...?geo_country=de usually you can find basic information there such as how to cultivate them. Or do you have a specific question ?


Il dort. Quoique le sort fût pour lui bien étrange,
Il vivait. Il mourut quand il n'eut plus son ange;
La chose simplement d'elle-même arriva,
Comme la nuit se fait lorsque le jour s'en va.

 


#8 GeorgeZB

GeorgeZB

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 10 May 2014 - 05:57 AM

I'm back again!laugh.png

I searched http://www.lgcstandards-atcc.org and found commercial normal human airway epithelial cells. I think they can be used as a control in my future work~thank Tabalugatongue.png

I'm embarrassed to ask another question, which may be kindgarden to you all, that if I could cultivate cells in my lab then transfer them to another lab in another city? How to achieve it? Will they lose vitality after long time transportation?


Edited by GeorgeZB, 10 May 2014 - 06:15 AM.


#9 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,728 posts
399
Excellent

Posted 10 May 2014 - 01:52 PM

Note that if you are crossing borders from one country to another you need to ensure that you have all the relevant permits for importation and exporting and biological safety.  If you are transporting by air you need to follow IATA guidelines or risk a very very big fine (US$ 100,000 or more).  In both cases I would strongly suggest using a registered courier company (I usually use World Couriers, but I have heard good things about FedEx) as they should be able to tell you the requirements, and handle the shipping properly.

 

There are two methods of transport of cell lines - as a frozen cell suspension or as a living culture in a flask.

 

Frozen cells can be transported on dry ice for as long as your dry ice lasts or as long as you can refill the container with dry ice.  Note that dry ice is frozen CO2, so if you are transporting it yourself in a vehicle make sure that you don't get gassed as it sublimates!

 

Living cultures in flasks will be OK for a 2-4 days, the flask needs to be filled as full as you can get and an impermeable lid (i.e. lid with no gas diffusion filter) placed on it tightly.  The flask should be shipped at room temperature and not be subject to big changes in temperature (i.e. no hot cars!).



#10 GeorgeZB

GeorgeZB

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 12 May 2014 - 10:49 PM

Thank you! It seems extremely dangerous! Transporting living cultures is also difficult! Without your advice, I might have been lying in my car, with my soul talking to you all!

Edited by GeorgeZB, 12 May 2014 - 10:51 PM.


#11 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,728 posts
399
Excellent

Posted 13 May 2014 - 02:03 AM

The main dangers with dry ice are making sure that you don't gas yourself and not sealing the container too tightly (explosion hazard) - If you are using a polystyrene container punch a small hole or two (10 ml pipette works well for this) in the lid, that will take care of the explosion risk.  Gassing yourself can be prevented by making sure the container is in a separate compartment of the car (i.e. if you have a station wagon, it's all the same compartment, sedans will probably be OK), and that you keep the incoming air on fresh or have a window open.  Similar to the advice for using gas cookers and heaters inside really.

 

Note also that if you have the container in the boot/trunk of the car, then you need to air it out before you go sticking your head in - inhaling large quantities of CO2 will very rapidly cause you to pass out and then you will be lying with your head inside a pool of CO2 (or on the ground having just hit your head on the car as you fell). 



#12 Eve Technologies

Eve Technologies

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 29 May 2014 - 09:38 AM

I would recommend shipping cell cultures frozen because you cannot control the environment once you place your package in the hands of the shipping company.  Along with temperature fluctuations, non-frozen cell cultures can be subjected to pressure changes and other physical forces like shaking and dropping.  Package the frozen culture with at least 5kg of Dry Ice.  In a standard Styrofoam box, dry ice will sublimate at a rate of about 1.5kg per 24 hours.  Most often, you can ship stuff to arrive next day, however there are at times delays that can occur such as inclement weather, and customs delays.  The MOST important measure to take to avoid a delay is to make sure that your documentation is properly filled out.  We receive dozens of dry-ice shipments every week, and of the few that are delayed, it is almost always due to incorrectly filled out documents.  For a reference on how to ship biological substances and how to fill out documents - here is a guide:  

 

http://evetechnologi.... Aug. 2013.pdf

 

I would disagree with bob1 about the dangers of shipping with dry ice - it is a bit of fear-mongering.  You are not going to pass-out from CO2 if you have a box of dry ice in your car taking it to a courier.  It sublimates too slowly on its own.  You would have to open the box, dump in a bunch of water to really get it smoking, then stick your head in the box.  FedEx planes and trucks move hundreds of dry-ice packages at once.  The drivers are not wearing oxygen masks or driving with the window open.  You do not have to poke holes in your Styrofoam box either.  These boxes are made to transport dry-ice and are not air-tight.  poking holes will only cause the dry-ice to sublimate faster.  You only risk explosion if you put dry-ice in an air-tight container like a thermos or bottle.  

 

Shipping samples internationally is quite easy.  I can only speak to shipping samples to Canada - for us human samples do not require permits.  Animal samples do, but this is automatically provided by the CFIA upon package arrival at customs.



#13 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,728 posts
399
Excellent

Posted 29 May 2014 - 01:01 PM

I'm not fear mongering - the poking holes are what World couriers do for all dry ice shipments that i have received in the past 5 years.  Note that I am in NZ, which is substantially further away than most places, so shipments normally take longer than 3 days to get here and require large amounts of dry ice.  Also note that most courier trucks and planes have separate compartments where the driver sits, so there is no chance of them getting gassed anyway.  Gassing in cars is rare, but if you were travelling long distance it can happen.

 

see: http://rgl.faa.gov/R...256f9400528023/$FILE/AC91-76.pdf






Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.