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NucleoSpin

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#1 pito

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 12:00 PM

Hallo all,

 

just curious: anyone here been using NucleoSpin for plasmid extractions?

I use the GenElute plasmid miniprep kit from sigma at the moment.

THe nucleospin kit however is faster (have been told so) and cheaper.
For the amounts I use it, it could be usefull the change it.. but wondering if anyone has experience with it? (could not find anyone in the labs I know that works with the NucleoSpin kit.

 

any insights?

 


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#2 bob1

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 12:27 AM

We have some in our lab, but I haven't used it personally (I use the Axygen ones - fast and relatively cheap), but those who have used it suggested that it was complex to use and didn't give a great return in terms of amount of DNA, though the DNA was very pure.



#3 pito

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 12:48 AM

We have some in our lab, but I haven't used it personally (I use the Axygen ones - fast and relatively cheap), but those who have used it suggested that it was complex to use and didn't give a great return in terms of amount of DNA, though the DNA was very pure.

 

The axygen ones seem to be only selling the 50 preps kit.

 

Strange they mention the nucleospin as complex , it is easier/faster than for example the genelute kit from sigma.

 

what exactly did you mean with not a great return in terms of DNA amount? (any idea how much µg? for 2ml I guess)


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#4 bob1

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 11:30 AM

 

The axygen ones seem to be only selling the 50 preps kit.

 

Strange they mention the nucleospin as complex , it is easier/faster than for example the genelute kit from sigma.

 

what exactly did you mean with not a great return in terms of DNA amount? (any idea how much µg? for 2ml I guess)

 

I've just had a look in the lab, and they were using the Nucleobond, which is (probably) different to the Nucleospin, so some of the following may not apply.

 

The complexity lies in the equilibration and other steps that are required.  The Axygen kits only are basically just an ordinary alkaline lysis with a filtration step and a DNA column using either spin or vacuum to get the DNA onto the column.  The Nucleobond ones you have to equilibrate the column before use, then drip the solution through (slow) followed by an IPA precipitation. 

 

I don't know about the amount much, but I do know that they don't use the Nucleobond any more.



#5 pito

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 11:37 AM

 

 

The axygen ones seem to be only selling the 50 preps kit.

 

Strange they mention the nucleospin as complex , it is easier/faster than for example the genelute kit from sigma.

 

what exactly did you mean with not a great return in terms of DNA amount? (any idea how much µg? for 2ml I guess)

 

I've just had a look in the lab, and they were using the Nucleobond, which is (probably) different to the Nucleospin, so some of the following may not apply.

 

The complexity lies in the equilibration and other steps that are required.  The Axygen kits only are basically just an ordinary alkaline lysis with a filtration step and a DNA column using either spin or vacuum to get the DNA onto the column.  The Nucleobond ones you have to equilibrate the column before use, then drip the solution through (slow) followed by an IPA precipitation. 

 

I don't know about the amount much, but I do know that they don't use the Nucleobond any more.

 

 

Ok thats something completely different than!

The nucleospin one is also a typical alkaline lysis protocol.


If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.





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