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Dissecting Pans

Autoclave Wax

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#1 LabTekkie

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 11:39 AM

Hello All!  I'm new to these forums and new to being a general lab techincian for biology and chemistry departments.  I have been doing some prep work for the upcoming semester and I wanted to do something about the dissecting pans used at my school.  They were dirty and the wax was really marked up.  I gave them all a thorough cleaning then ran them through the autoclave to melt the wax and sterilize it.  I used to do this at the end of each semester for a university where I was once a work-study student and got great results.

 

Upon runinng the trays through a liquid cycle a few turned out nicely but most were marked and unsmooth.  Any adivce would be greatly appreciated!



#2 hobglobin

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 12:45 PM

I'd use a drying or heating cabinet for this.


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

#3 LabTekkie

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 06:58 AM

Any recommendations on temperature or time left in cabinet?



#4 hobglobin

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 08:39 AM

Until it's melted which depends on amounts and wax composition. Wax usually melts around 60 °C but with higher temps it's faster...I wonder if the cooling down speed has an effect on the smooth surface, i.e. perhaps a fast cooling rate might reduce development of a wavy surface, or vice versa?


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.





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