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Deferoxamine mesylate concentration


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#1 stellaparallax

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 05:57 AM

Hi there,

 

Was hoping someone could offer some assistance. I need to measure deferoxamine mesylate concentration in solution. Is there any way that this can be produced spectrometrically?



#2 bob1

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 12:02 PM

I doubt it, but then I'm not much of a chemist.  I would guess that you would probably need some sort of chromatography.



#3 El Crazy Xabi

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 10:02 PM

Pure in solution or in a mixture?

 

This complex compounds are usually measured by chromatography.

 

http://www.anapa.com...load.php?fid=16



#4 stellaparallax

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 12:47 AM

It's the only thing in solution (PBS). Can I do this spectrometrically?



#5 bob1

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 12:49 PM

PBS also contains phosphates and salt... so not the only thing in solution!  I would still doubt spec will work!



#6 El Crazy Xabi

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 05:38 PM

Even using PBS as blank for UV/Vis and having a standard solution of your compound...

 

In the document I linked, they used Abs400nm to check potential byproducts, being the compound stable for 1 week. You  may do a concentration curve with the Abs of solutions with known concentration and measuring your sample... but I wouldn't trust it very much. To do this you usually do a scan on the UV/Vis and select the most concentration-sensitive peak or the highest, preparing all solutions from scratch the problem is that you don't know if there are any potential byproducts that may have stronger/weaker and/or overlapping signal with your compound, and as older the solution, the more likely to happen.

 

If you still want to try it I would conduct a stability check based on the spectra over an extended period of time enough to reach the age of your problem solution, doing full scans over the whole UV/Vis range your spectrophotometer allows to check alterations on the normal spectrum. If the spectra are stable over the whole period of study I would start to rely on the suitability of the method, and perform the concentration curve.






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