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Bacteria in low humidity


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#1 anu2016

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 11:11 AM

For a science project, I was looking for a bacteria that would last on surfaces for a long time, in low humidity, relatively lower temperatures (20-40 degrees Fahrenheit), low pressure (5000 feet elevation), and less oxygen. Do you know of any bacteria that will survive and thrive under conditions similar the the ones aforementioned?

#2 bob1

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:01 PM

Do you mean ones that will grow under those conditions or ones that would survive in spore form or similar?



#3 anu2016

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 03:12 PM

The ones that would survive.

#4 Phil Geis

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 04:22 AM

spore formers will survive in that form.  Might be easier to find fungi that would "thrive" under such conditions.



#5 hobglobin

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 08:51 AM

I read once a paper about aerial or air-borne bacteria in higher portions of the atmosphere where they found many different types that are viable and involved in processes such as serving as cloud condensation nuclei or contributing to the degradation of organic pollutants (but for this they surely need sufficient humidity to be active).

A short google search result: http://www.wired.com...obes-make-rain/

Anyway I've no idea if this are specialised bacteria of if they were dispersed there by chance.


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#6 pito

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 12:01 PM

Define low humidity...

What do you mean?

Water activity of how much?

For a science project, I was looking for a bacteria that would last on surfaces for a long time, in low humidity, relatively lower temperatures (20-40 degrees Fahrenheit), low pressure (5000 feet elevation), and less oxygen. Do you know of any bacteria that will survive and thrive under conditions similar the the ones aforementioned?


If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#7 El Crazy Xabi

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 05:44 PM

Could you specify a little bit more?

Those that will survive and those that will thrive are not the same. Many will survive even without spores but thriving under those conditions you'll need some psycrophylic/psycrotolerant bug, and that just regarding temp. By the way, try to use SI units please.

Pressure, not a problem the altitude you specify is not that high.

How much less oxygen (%)?

If you take a look to any work about McMurdo valley or any other Antarctic ecosystem... they will live in the conditions you ask about

 

If you are also interested in fungi you can take a look to these:

 

Selbmann L, De Hoog GS, Mazzaglia A, et al. (2005) Fungi at the edge of life: cryptoendolithic black fungi from Antarctic desert. Stud Mycol 51:1–32.
Selbmann L, De Hoog GS, Zucconi L, et al. (2008) Drought meets acid: Three new genera in a Dothidealean clade of extremotolerant fungi. Stud Mycol 61:1–20. doi: 10.3114/sim.2008.61.01





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