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Coral Mushroom


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27 replies to this topic

#16 hobglobin

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 11:16 AM

so you are still alive and healthy...congrats and good that you could enjoy the meal...

here in our canteen they served mushrooms from the can to fill up a nice quiche...I avoided them biggrin.png


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#17 Jon Moulton

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 11:25 AM

Fresh is better, but mushrooms from a can still beats modified corn syrup and alginate.


Edited by Jon Moulton, 22 November 2013 - 11:25 AM.

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#18 Trof

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 03:06 PM

Mycologists commonly recommend keeping mushrooms in the fridge for no more than 3 days, since they are very prone to molds.

Also it's important not to pick or store them in plastic bags, this can cause food poisoning even from otherwise very edible mushrooms. Also, they shouldn't be frozen unless cooked.

Canned mushrooms are OK, though they taste bit different. You can also make pickles of them :)

 

And that would be end of todays Food Network. Good Night ;)


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#19 pito

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 08:22 AM

Can you explain that statement?

Mycologists commonly recommend keeping mushrooms in the fridge for no more than 3 days, since they are very prone to molds.

Also it's important not to pick or store them in plastic bags, this can cause food poisoning even from otherwise very edible mushrooms. Also, they shouldn't be frozen unless cooked.

Canned mushrooms are OK, though they taste bit different. You can also make pickles of them smile.png

 

And that would be end of todays Food Network. Good Night wink.png


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#20 Ameya P

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 02:08 AM

 

Can you explain that statement?

Mycologists commonly recommend keeping mushrooms in the fridge for no more than 3 days, since they are very prone to molds.

Also it's important not to pick or store them in plastic bags, this can cause food poisoning even from otherwise very edible mushrooms. Also, they shouldn't be frozen unless cooked.

Canned mushrooms are OK, though they taste bit different. You can also make pickles of them smile.png

 

And that would be end of todays Food Network. Good Night wink.png

 

Yes, Trof, even I am interested in knowing why not store them in plastic bags. All supermarkets here sell them in plastic bags. 


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#21 pito

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 02:47 AM

 

 

Can you explain that statement?

Mycologists commonly recommend keeping mushrooms in the fridge for no more than 3 days, since they are very prone to molds.

Also it's important not to pick or store them in plastic bags, this can cause food poisoning even from otherwise very edible mushrooms. Also, they shouldn't be frozen unless cooked.

Canned mushrooms are OK, though they taste bit different. You can also make pickles of them smile.png

 

And that would be end of todays Food Network. Good Night wink.png

 

Yes, Trof, even I am interested in knowing why not store them in plastic bags. All supermarkets here sell them in plastic bags. 

 

 

 

What I do know is that mushrooms can not be packed in closed packaging (there need to be holes in it or it has to be a breathing packaging) because otherwise you get an anaerobic situation in which clostridium and/or desulfotomaculum can grow...

But I am not sure this is what trof means because this is about bacteria making it bad, not the mushrooms itself...

 

 

So I do wonder what he exactly means....


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#22 Trof

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 07:05 AM

The reasons for not keeping mushrooms in closed packaging is as I learned mostly the decomposition of their proteins, also the overgrowth of bacteria is one of the reasons. Wild forest mushrooms can be also contaminated by Salmonela from forest animals.

 

Also one quite important thing from the various "Myths and thruths about mushrooms" that I ommited is that mushrooms generaly don't go well with large amounts of alcohol. Several mushrooms from Coprinus genus are specifically known to cause "disulfiram syndrome" when consumed even with a small quantity of alcohol.


Our country has a serious deficiency in lighthouses. I assume the main reason is that we have no sea.

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#23 pito

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 07:53 AM

The decomposition of their proteins? Meaning that "bad" proteins will be formed ?

Sounds weird

The reasons for not keeping mushrooms in closed packaging is as I learned mostly the decomposition of their proteins, also the overgrowth of bacteria is one of the reasons. Wild forest mushrooms can be also contaminated by Salmonela from forest animals.

 

Also one quite important thing from the various "Myths and thruths about mushrooms" that I ommited is that mushrooms generaly don't go well with large amounts of alcohol. Several mushrooms from Coprinus genus are specifically known to cause "disulfiram syndrome" when consumed even with a small quantity of alcohol.


If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#24 hobglobin

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 09:00 AM

Perhaps fungal prions...laugh.png

 

 

The decomposition of their proteins? Meaning that "bad" proteins will be formed ?

Sounds weird

The reasons for not keeping mushrooms in closed packaging is as I learned mostly the decomposition of their proteins, also the overgrowth of bacteria is one of the reasons. Wild forest mushrooms can be also contaminated by Salmonela from forest animals.

 

Also one quite important thing from the various "Myths and thruths about mushrooms" that I ommited is that mushrooms generaly don't go well with large amounts of alcohol. Several mushrooms from Coprinus genus are specifically known to cause "disulfiram syndrome" when consumed even with a small quantity of alcohol.

 


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#25 Trof

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 10:04 AM

I think they were referring to autolytic processes (similar to meat), so it's like "spoiling" of the cell material by endogenous sources (cell intrinsic proteolytic and glykolytic enzymes) in contrast to bacterial.


Our country has a serious deficiency in lighthouses. I assume the main reason is that we have no sea.

I never trust anything that can't be doubted.

'Normal' is a dryer setting. - Elizabeth Moon


#26 pito

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 10:17 AM

I can understand that, but does it make the mushroom toxic? Seem with the meat, the breakdown of the meat does not make it toxic.

I think they were referring to autolytic processes (similar to meat), so it's like "spoiling" of the cell material by endogenous sources (cell intrinsic proteolytic and glykolytic enzymes) in contrast to bacterial.


If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.


#27 Trof

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 11:34 AM

Probably depends how you define "toxic". It can cause stomach problems, which is not something to look forward to after a meal. I can imagine for certain individuals, severe version of this may be even dangerous. It is definitelly not something defined in English as "poisonous", but the term "toxic" is rather vague. Toxins  (biological)  are either the well defined substances, including mycotoxins or it's vaguely anything which does harm to body.

 

But most likely in such cases, you will get both increased autolysis and bacterial rotting. I don't think anyone is sterilizing their mushrooms. Meat seems to be protected from bacteria in the intial stages of autolysis, but keeping it in humid conditions speeds it up and make more succeptible to bacterial infections. With mushrooms it can be similar but without the initial protection part (I don't think mushrooms have that much of lactic acid inside).

While you get some articles on meat rotting (since it's industrial problem) it's very scarce to find something specific on mushroom rotting apart from hobby magazines ;) But as mostly people understand that meat can go off and that may cause bad stomach problems, they would tend to treat mushrooms more like a vegetable than like a meat, though the cellular characteristics are probably somewhere "in the middle" (though I have no idea if that is really a reason for this).


Our country has a serious deficiency in lighthouses. I assume the main reason is that we have no sea.

I never trust anything that can't be doubted.

'Normal' is a dryer setting. - Elizabeth Moon


#28 pito

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 09:23 AM

I guess the piece in bold is indeed the point to be made. It just creates a micro climat and causes either more rapid growth in general or perhaps causes the growth of anaerobics (that could be very toxic).

But it would not "turn" the mushrooms in something not eatible if they were eatible before. Its just the bacteria/mold causing problems.

 

Probably depends how you define "toxic". It can cause stomach problems, which is not something to look forward to after a meal. I can imagine for certain individuals, severe version of this may be even dangerous. It is definitelly not something defined in English as "poisonous", but the term "toxic" is rather vague. Toxins  (biological)  are either the well defined substances, including mycotoxins or it's vaguely anything which does harm to body.

 

But most likely in such cases, you will get both increased autolysis and bacterial rotting. I don't think anyone is sterilizing their mushrooms. Meat seems to be protected from bacteria in the intial stages of autolysis, but keeping it in humid conditions speeds it up and make more succeptible to bacterial infections. With mushrooms it can be similar but without the initial protection part (I don't think mushrooms have that much of lactic acid inside).

While you get some articles on meat rotting (since it's industrial problem) it's very scarce to find something specific on mushroom rotting apart from hobby magazines wink.png But as mostly people understand that meat can go off and that may cause bad stomach problems, they would tend to treat mushrooms more like a vegetable than like a meat, though the cellular characteristics are probably somewhere "in the middle" (though I have no idea if that is really a reason for this).

 


If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.





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