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Coral Mushroom


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#1 Jon Moulton

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 02:59 PM

A fine day in the Oregon woods.

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Edited by Jon Moulton, 19 November 2013 - 03:03 PM.

Jon D. Moulton
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#2 bob1

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 04:10 PM

Nice, not often you see one as big as that.



#3 hobglobin

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 09:04 AM

looks great and is it edible?


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#4 Jon Moulton

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 09:12 AM

If I have the ID right, it's Ramaria botrytis and it's described as "choice".  I'm confident enough to try it tonight (mophology match, spore print match, reacts with ferric sulfate turning green - a characteristic of the Rameria genus).  http://en.wikipedia....amaria_botrytis


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#5 Trof

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:59 AM

In our country, where picking and eating wild-growing mushrooms is a popular hobby, similar species Ramaria aurea (in czech translated somehow as "small golden chicks" - meaning little chicken, not ladies) is seen quite a lot, though I've never seen more than few stems together. That's too small to consider a "catch" so many don't pick it at all, but the very bright yellow to orange color makes very nice color component to the traditional fried mushroom mix and it's definitelly beautiful to see it in the middle of the forest green.

 

Though we don't usually don't decide to eat mushrooms based on their reaction to Fe2(SO4)3  or spore matching, congratulations to your dinner! smile.png


Our country has a serious deficiency in lighthouses. I assume the main reason is that we have no sea.

I never trust anything that can't be doubted.

'Normal' is a dryer setting. - Elizabeth Moon


#6 Jon Moulton

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 11:16 AM

Thanks Trof.  I'm very careful before eating a wild-gathered species the first time.  The only step I skipped is the spore microscopy, since I don't have good optics at home.  Spore-print color is a pretty good characteristic with which to narrow down a species and takes no extra steps.  I was surprised that the iron-salt test can be done with various different iron salts and still (reportedly) generates the green color; I assume that is from a chelation reation, though I suppose it could be redox chemistry with a mushroom component. If anyone knows the mechanism of that test, please chime in!  Anyway, we have some deadly poisonous varieties that grow wild in Oregon (e.g. Amanita pantherina) so the slow and careful approach to identificatoin seems prudent.


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Gene Tools, LLC
www.gene-tools.com

#7 hobglobin

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:06 PM

oops in Germany it exists too, called "cockscomb coral"...but it's rare and has a status as an endangered fungus species, perhaps that's the reason I didn't know it. And we have only a few others you can confuse with, but they are inedible e.g. the bellyache coral (Ramaria mairei) laugh.png


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#8 Trof

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:08 PM

I'm no mushroom expert in the first place, so I only pick up those I know and like (which are mostly from Boletus genus, since those can by dried up and used later for an absolutely great mushroom soup). 

But the advantage of local cultural background is, that mushroom identification skills are widespread (clearly those who failed at it were selected out long ago, LOL ;) ) so it's a common knowledge, what mushrooms do live in our woods, which are edible, and which can be possibly mistaken, and what are the morphologic features to look for, without need of any specific testing.

Panther cap is also a common mushroom here, but it's quite safely possible to distinguish it from the also common blusher.

We also have the honours to have Amanita phalloides growing in our woods, that is really a master of all mistakes to pick one, so many people who are not sure about their skills don't pick even any similarly looking ones. I remeber seeing them once in the forest.. tall, white, clean lines, but not so much greenish as they should be (mushrooms lie with colors sometimes, so that's not the only feature to rely on) to clearly signal out.. it was bit chilling feeling to imagine that these could poison a whole family.. because they were wery nice, unfortunately allegedly as reported, they have a great taste, so you may not know you're eating something dangerous.

 

But as I was writing this.. I wonder, if it would be possible to create a specific identification kit, based on DNA. But as I think of it, that would be used for classification, but several species are quite related yet they differ in the toxicity much more. Maybe a quick immunoasay for the mushroom toxin would make more sense...


Our country has a serious deficiency in lighthouses. I assume the main reason is that we have no sea.

I never trust anything that can't be doubted.

'Normal' is a dryer setting. - Elizabeth Moon


#9 hobglobin

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:25 PM

We have that one too...unfortunately it seems that immigrants from east Europe and Russia pick and eat them, since from their countries of origin they are accustomed to a very similar looking mushroom species that is edible...so every year there are several fatal casualties because of this confusion. dry.png


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#10 Trof

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 03:52 PM

That's the problem with migration.

For one I heard picking mushrooms in the US/England/.. is less competetive (if you don't get arrested for doing that, in certain places, probably..) since less people are doing that, BUT as in different places you can have different population of mushrooms, including different look-alike varieties that can be mistaken, you need to acquire the local knowledge. But since it's rare for ordinary people to do that in those countries.. unless you have the luck and meet a mycologist (at least an amateur one), you can't really learn that.

 

So of course I wouldn't pick mushrooms in foreign countries. Unless it is also a mushroom-picking country with local knowledge available, like China or Italy.

(but obviously, mushroom-picking in Italy is way more dangerous, but not because of mushrooms..;)

 

But it is quite interesting how certain custom are different in different countries. Picking wild mushrooms is considered perfectly safe here unless you're an idiot and pick what you are not sure of. But it can be considered risky and unworthy elsewhere and buying of cellar-grown mushrooms is prefered. I also mostly buy the field mushroom in the supermarket (aah, searching for these names in english is frustrating.. for one, you call them all "mushrooms", we have at least 4 general categories.. most Agaricus species are one of them) but that's because it is the only available. Most valued mushrooms here are the Boletus ones, but those can't be cultivated, so wild picking (or buying the handpicked for an excessive price) is the only choice.
Also poppy seed is popular here not only for few here and there on there on top of buns, but as a sweet filling of many sweet pastries. For some reason these are often considered kind of "illegal drugs" elsewhere although mature seeds have negligible amounts of opium alkaloids (despite popular believes and despite the fact it can cross react with certain drug tests).


Our country has a serious deficiency in lighthouses. I assume the main reason is that we have no sea.

I never trust anything that can't be doubted.

'Normal' is a dryer setting. - Elizabeth Moon


#11 Jon Moulton

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 08:27 AM

It was delicious.  I tried a bit yesterday, sauteed with garlic and butter.  I wanted more but decided it woud be prudent to wait a day and see how the initial dose goes. 


Jon D. Moulton
Gene Tools, LLC
www.gene-tools.com

#12 hobglobin

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 12:13 PM

Hope you are still fine Jon wink.png .

And for some fungal and viral plant pathogens microarrays were developed and are still in development. Perhaps eventually in the furture a hand-held device for mushroom collectors is on the market...biggrin.png


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#13 bob1

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 12:15 PM

It was delicious.  I tried a bit yesterday, sauteed with garlic and butter.  I wanted more but decided it woud be prudent to wait a day and see how the initial dose goes. 

And your next post should be something along the lines of:

 

"Aaaargh <clutches chest>, thump" ;)



#14 Jon Moulton

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 01:01 PM

 

It was delicious.  I tried a bit yesterday, sauteed with garlic and butter.  I wanted more but decided it woud be prudent to wait a day and see how the initial dose goes. 

And your next post should be something along the lines of:

 

"Aaaargh <clutches chest>, thump" wink.png

 

We'll see if I'm posting tomorrow...


Jon D. Moulton
Gene Tools, LLC
www.gene-tools.com

#15 Jon Moulton

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 08:34 AM

Rameria botrytis stir-fried with bitter melon -- delicious!


Jon D. Moulton
Gene Tools, LLC
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