Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

Dissolve of Maltodextrin

chemistry maltodextrin biochemistry

Best Answer hobglobin, 18 November 2013 - 10:40 AM

Usually you can try to heat the water to increase the dissolved substance. Also the quantity you want to dissolve plays a role. Maltodextrin might be then form a viscous and turbid fluid as it's an oligosaccharide, perhaps this might be the observed precipitate?
I'm not sure how good maltodextrin is defined so solubility surely depends on the composition of the actual chemical you have: the more short chains you have the easier and the more will be dissolved. If you have mostly long chains it will become much more difficult (the chains vary from 2 to 20 sugar units), as it's more like starch then.

And why do you compare with lactic acid? This is a quite different molecule with different properties and size.

Go to the full post


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Celz

Celz

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 74 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 17 November 2013 - 04:57 PM

Dear all, 

 

Does anyone have any idea how to dissolve maltodextrin completely? I was trying to use distilled water (at room temperature), but it still can't dissolve completely. However when I used lactic acid, it can dissolved and no precipitate formed. What causing it happened?  

 

Thank you. 



#2 hobglobin

hobglobin

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,506 posts
94
Excellent

Posted 18 November 2013 - 10:40 AM   Best Answer

Usually you can try to heat the water to increase the dissolved substance. Also the quantity you want to dissolve plays a role. Maltodextrin might be then form a viscous and turbid fluid as it's an oligosaccharide, perhaps this might be the observed precipitate?
I'm not sure how good maltodextrin is defined so solubility surely depends on the composition of the actual chemical you have: the more short chains you have the easier and the more will be dissolved. If you have mostly long chains it will become much more difficult (the chains vary from 2 to 20 sugar units), as it's more like starch then.

And why do you compare with lactic acid? This is a quite different molecule with different properties and size.


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

#3 Celz

Celz

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 74 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 18 November 2013 - 05:46 PM

Hi, 

Thanks for the reply. The lactic acid that I used was actually directly collected from the probiotic milk culture. Initially, I am planning to centrifuge out the acid layer and replace it with dH2O, however the result of it is not as good as direct dissolve in the culture. Thus, I am doubting is it maltodextrin easily to be dissolved in acid solution? 



#4 hobglobin

hobglobin

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional...

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,506 posts
94
Excellent

Posted 19 November 2013 - 11:05 AM

I could not imagine why it should be better soluble in lactic acid. if you heat it up too much you might esterify the maltodextrin.


One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

#5 Celz

Celz

    Enthusiast

  • Active Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 74 posts
2
Neutral

Posted 19 November 2013 - 04:26 PM

Thanks hobglobin, noted! smile.png







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: chemistry, maltodextrin, biochemistry

Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.