Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

Storage of Milli Q Water

storage milli q water

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 MkUltra

MkUltra

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 26 September 2013 - 05:18 PM

hi. How much time can I storage milli Q water on a Pyrex Bottle?



#2 jerryshelly1

jerryshelly1

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
29
Excellent

Posted 26 September 2013 - 06:19 PM

Make sure the pyrex is clean, add MilliQ water and then autoclave it.  As long as you maintain a seal on the bottle, you could potentially store it indefinitely. Even when I am using my Autoclaved MilliQ water as a stock, I like to frequently rinse, add new MilliQ water and autoclave (once every two or so weeks). A clean Pyrex bottle should not leach.



#3 phage434

phage434

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,416 posts
237
Excellent

Posted 26 September 2013 - 06:32 PM

CO2 in the air will gradually acidify milliQ water. For most applications, this can be ignored, since any buffer, even at very low concentrations, will drive the pH. If you really want the water pure, I would avoid the autoclave.



#4 jerryshelly1

jerryshelly1

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
29
Excellent

Posted 27 September 2013 - 07:03 AM

Just out of curiosity, why would you avoid the autoclave?



#5 phage434

phage434

    Veteran

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,416 posts
237
Excellent

Posted 27 September 2013 - 11:51 AM

MilliQ water has extremely high purity, and exposure to even a metal container will dissolve significant (relative to its purity) amounts of metal. An autoclave will leave a wide variety of contaminants. In biology, those are perhaps ignorable for many applications, but in other disciplines, such as seminconductor manufacturing, no one would dream of letting their water anywhere near an autoclave. If you are doing trace metal analysis, then you should probably be similarly skeptical. DNA contamination is probably more of a problem. Have you looked inside your autoclave recently? Sterile, yes, but pure, not so much.



#6 MkUltra

MkUltra

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 01 October 2013 - 06:06 PM

Thanks for the help







Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.