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Working in industry: molecular diagnosis

industry genetic diagnosis

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#1 OA17

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 12:30 PM

Hi!
I am finally getting to the end of my PhD and I have been offered a job in a molecular (genetic/biochemical) diagnosis company.

In principal, it will not be a research or bench position, but the job will rather entail the analysis of diagnosis results. I am not worried about not doing bench work because I am pretty tired of that and I really need a change. I have done my PhD in a different field, but I think that this can be much more interesting and I am sure that I will learn a lot.

I believe this can be a great opportunity to do something different from what I have done so far and I appreciate the fact that I have been offered the job despite being my first application and interview (in industry) ever and despite having no experience in this particular field.

However, I would like to hear the opinion of people who have worked or are currently working in this kind of job or know something about genetic diagnosis in industry. Can someone tell me which are the best and the worst things, according to your experience?
Any other comments will be also welcome!
Thanks in advance.

#2 Adrian K

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 01:03 PM

I had meet people doing genetics typing (HLA etc..) in similar industry.

 

The good thing is, you will get good pay :)

 

For your job (not sure if you were told):

1) You need to respond extremely fast for customer's inquiry. For your case, you need to analyze your results very fast, and might need to troubleshoot your customer's hands-on technique.

2) You need to communicate with medical doctors who is not from scientific research background.

3) You need to work under extreme pressure and required to travel extensively.

4) You might need to wear your lab coats again...

 

Hope this helps.


Expecting the world to treat you fairly because you are a good person is like expecting the lion not to attack you because you are a vegetarian.

..."best of our knowledge, as far as we know this had never been reported before, though I can't possible read all the published journals on earth, but by perform thorough search in google, the keywords did not match any documents"...

"what doesn't kill you, makes you stronger"---Goddess Casandra reminds me to be strong

"It's all just DNA. Do it."---phage434

#3 OA17

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 12:58 AM

Thanks for your answer, Adrian K! Sure it helps! :)

 

I think I'm quite used to working under pressure and I see that communicating and interacting with people outside research could be a plus. I have not been told about travelling a lot...(perhaps I should ask that). Wearing my labcoat again is not a problem, as long as it is something temporary.

 

Taking into consideration that in the future I don't see myself neither in academia nor as a bench scientist, would you think that this kind of job is interesting? Do the people that you know like it?

Since I come from a different background (PhD thesis in a completely different field), do you think that it's a good opportunity to learn new things?

Do you think it can be a good first step into industry (or at least a good step to get out of academia)?

 

From my point of view a good pay is not as important as both learning and doing a job which I know it will be useful for someone, although I wouldn't reject a good salary, of course!

 

Thanks again and have a nice day!



#4 Adrian K

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 02:27 AM

Hi, Kinda hard to tell if this is interesting... everyone might have different opinion.

From the guy I know (money minded) he definitely like it, but in reality, you might have to endure some terrible and rude nonsense from your customer whom some might not even have a degree. In my country,not all laboratory personnel is a tertiary education graduates, and trainers have to train them even from the most basic part.

Depends on company, some might train you before you go to the field, but some management might expect you to had already learn or known everything. If you are planning moving out from academia, it is good to try. Worst case scenario, you still can join back academia with your industrial experiences.

 

Good luck in your industrial adventure. Do let us know your adventures.

 

:)

 

Best Rgs,

Adrian


Expecting the world to treat you fairly because you are a good person is like expecting the lion not to attack you because you are a vegetarian.

..."best of our knowledge, as far as we know this had never been reported before, though I can't possible read all the published journals on earth, but by perform thorough search in google, the keywords did not match any documents"...

"what doesn't kill you, makes you stronger"---Goddess Casandra reminds me to be strong

"It's all just DNA. Do it."---phage434

#5 OA17

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 02:52 AM

Thanks Adrian!

I still have a few months before I start, but I will keep you informed.... (perhaps writing a blog about the transition could be a good choice!)

 

Best regards :)







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