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Is there a such thing that would allow me to generate 2 individual proteins, but


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Ahrenhase

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:21 PM

their expression in the same cell causes them to come together? i.e. a molecular tool for creating endogenous fusion proteins

#2 bob1

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 09:24 PM

Do you mean like subunits of proteins, or are you talking about joining proteins together as a single transcript?

For both, the answer is sure - you can express more than one protein inside any cell, so you should be able to do this OK. For mammalian proteins there are even "cell free" systems such as the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system.

Single transcript can be done by cloning as I am sure you know.

#3 Ahrenhase

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 06:57 AM

Do you mean like subunits of proteins, or are you talking about joining proteins together as a single transcript?

For both, the answer is sure - you can express more than one protein inside any cell, so you should be able to do this OK. For mammalian proteins there are even "cell free" systems such as the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system.

Single transcript can be done by cloning as I am sure you know.


What I'm asking is there like a short linker peptide (peptide #1) that can be expressed on one transgene, and another peptide (peptide #2) that can be expressed on another transgene, thereby only allowing the two proteins to come together when both transgenes are coexpressed in the same cell.

i.e. Transgene #1 = Protein-of-Interest #1 + peptide #1

Transgene #2 = Protein-of-interest #2 + peptide #2

Edited by Ahrenhase, 31 May 2013 - 06:59 AM.


#4 bob1

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 01:37 AM

AH, kind of like Biotin/streptavidin - you could try calmodulin and calmodulin recognition peptide tag.

#5 Ahrenhase

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:01 AM

AH, kind of like Biotin/streptavidin - you could try calmodulin and calmodulin recognition peptide tag.


Awesome, thanks. I know you've probably been at this stuff for a while, but is there a go to resource you usually use when trying to find out things like this.

#6 bob1

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 01:13 PM

Sorry, not that I am aware of. I usually just do a google search or two.




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