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Falsification in a grant

grant misconduct

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#1 delivery guys

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 05:47 PM

Hi,

I found a falsified graph in the R01 Grant. That is an electrophysiology recording in one panel of figure that had never been done. In a conference, one attendee asked me a question related to the data, and I answered his question according to the data. He was very suspicious about the data based on his experience, and I promised to get back to him.

Once I came back to the lab, I talked with my PI about the specific question the attendee gave me. He just gave me blunt answer as if he had not done the experiment written in the grant. I became really suspicious about this, and I asked the postdoc in the lab about the data. He was supposed to be the person who conducted the experiment, but he told me he had not done any of the experiment, and he guessed the PI just put the graph representing something different.

I was really shocked with what I was told. Along with other things PI had told me, I have not totally trusted the PI and the data in the lab.

These were one of the reasons I quit the lab. I really feel these kind of misconduct will prevent from science to progress.

Now, I would like to know what you think about this. If you were in my situation, would you report this to NIH? Why and why not?

Thanks a lot.

#2 jerryshelly1

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 10:19 AM

Wow. Are you absolutely sure it was not a mistake on your PI's part. He may have misinterpreted a result that was presented to him. I would go and talk to him and make sure you are on the same page. You do not want this to bite you in the ass in your years to come. Does anyone else in your lab feel the same way? If this was deliberate, you are right. This is the exact opposite of science. Not only will this affect your experiments, but also those who try to repeat and expand upon in different labs. I would be careful.

#3 delivery guys

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 08:26 PM

Hi jellyshelly1,

Thanks a lot for your reply. The postdoc in our lab conducted the series of experiments, and he told me he has not done the experiment leading to the one graph in the figure. The postdoc also felt that the PI had put the graph so the grant looked more convincing.

I did ask my PI indirectly about the graph, and it turned out the PI knew our lad had not done any experiment leading to the graph.

Anyways, I agree to your point that I have to be careful. Reporting this may do good for science, but it may put myself at risk.

#4 pito

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 11:38 PM

Hi jellyshelly1,

Thanks a lot for your reply. The postdoc in our lab conducted the series of experiments, and he told me he has not done the experiment leading to the one graph in the figure. The postdoc also felt that the PI had put the graph so the grant looked more convincing.

I did ask my PI indirectly about the graph, and it turned out the PI knew our lad had not done any experiment leading to the graph.

Anyways, I agree to your point that I have to be careful. Reporting this may do good for science, but it may put myself at risk.

ANd make sure your name isnt on the paper/abstract or whatever....

If you don't know it, then ask it! Better to ask and look foolish to some than not ask and stay stupid.






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