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Canine Interbreeding

coyote wolf Canis lupus latrans

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#1 grandta13

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 11:43 AM

I would like to know if a coyote (Canis latrans) can breed with a wolf or domestic dog (Canis lupus [familiaris]) and produce fertile offspring. I have searched on the Internet, but have not found anything addressing this topic specifically.

#2 hobglobin

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 12:51 PM

as far as I know they can and produce hybrids called Coydogs, which are fertile

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#3 grandta13

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 07:49 AM

as far as I know they can and produce hybrids called Coydogs, which are fertile

If these canine hybrids are fertile, then why aren't coyotes called Canis lupus latrans? As I was taught, two animals are of the same species if they can breed and produce fertile offspring.

#4 hobglobin

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 08:57 AM

Well there are many definitions of species, and that's one of several...anyway for this definition it's the question if coyotes and dogs do produce fertile offspring in natural conditions and not if humans bring them together or even do a test-tube fertilisation. In nature there are sufficient other barriers that can lead to the two species as we understand it, such as geographical barriers, different behaviour (mating barrier), different time of estrus (physiological barrier) etc. (not sure if and then which barrier is working for canines)
This can then be even more complicated when humans introduce a new (sub-)species in the area of the other species and then they can interbreed (it is estimated that the domestic dog's origin is East Asia as far as I know, and therefore new for Americas). Anyway this shows the obstacles and limitations of species definitions Posted Image .

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#5 grandta13

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 07:10 AM

Well there are many definitions of species, and that's one of several...anyway for this definition it's the question if coyotes and dogs do produce fertile offspring in natural conditions and not if humans bring them together or even do a test-tube fertilisation. In nature there are sufficient other barriers that can lead to the two species as we understand it, such as geographical barriers, different behaviour (mating barrier), different time of estrus (physiological barrier) etc. (not sure if and then which barrier is working for canines)
This can then be even more complicated when humans introduce a new (sub-)species in the area of the other species and then they can interbreed (it is estimated that the domestic dog's origin is East Asia as far as I know, and therefore new for Americas). Anyway this shows the obstacles and limitations of species definitions Posted Image .


Thank you. This has resolved several issues I was having with differentiating between species.




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