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Literature quote guessing game


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#31 bob1

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 11:34 PM

Cassandra is correct - King of the Geats, so it's her turn again.

The second I will reserve for a later go, unless people want a hint?

#32 hobglobin

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:32 AM

The first I'd think of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, but not sure which book then...but a pure guess..

Edited by hobglobin, 19 January 2013 - 01:30 PM.

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#33 casandra

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:09 PM

the first one- I still have no idea so we shelve it first Posted Image...and here's something really easy (all the clues are in there Posted Image):

"Expecting Deltas to know what liberty is! And now expecting them to understand Othello! My good boy!"

Edited by casandra, 19 January 2013 - 01:09 PM.

"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#34 hobglobin

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:33 PM

Finally an easy one Huxley: Brave New World Posted Image

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#35 casandra

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 03:13 AM

Finally an easy one Huxley: Brave New World Posted Image


yup, that was correct (and of course almost a bonus question :lol:) so it's once again your turn, dr H...
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#36 hobglobin

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 09:03 AM

okay and I still wonder about bob's first one Posted Image
and here is the next:

"As with mariners shipwrecked near a coast, it would have been better for the good swimmers if they had been able to swim still further, whereas it would have been better for the bad swimmers if they had not been able to swim at all and had stuck to the wreck."

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#37 bob1

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:55 AM

Could be "Man who Laughs" Victor Hugo?

#38 hobglobin

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:53 PM

Unfortunately or luckily not Posted Image .
BTW what about your first quote?

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#39 bob1

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 01:26 PM

OK a hint then: This author was at his peake in the 1940's and 50's.

#40 Tabaluga

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 01:29 PM

@hobglobin: Moby Dick by Melville ?

@bob1: something by Agatha Christie, or Ernest Hemingway ?

Edited by Tabaluga, 20 January 2013 - 01:59 PM.

Il dort. Quoique le sort fût pour lui bien étrange,
Il vivait. Il mourut quand il n'eut plus son ange;
La chose simplement d'elle-même arriva,
Comme la nuit se fait lorsque le jour s'en va.

 


#41 bob1

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 02:12 PM

@bob1: something by Agatha Christie, or Ernest Hemingway ?

No.

#42 casandra

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 08:13 PM

"As with mariners shipwrecked near a coast, it would have been better for the good swimmers if they had been able to swim still further, whereas it would have been better for the bad swimmers if they had not been able to swim at all and had stuck to the wreck."


If this here were really about ship wrecks and far away islands- probably Swift's Gulliver's Travels though I prefer Umberto Eco's The Island of the Day Before (but this is too recent to be a classic)....I'm guessing this is symbolic (good and bad?) therefore an analogy.... or could be philosophical too...you're not pulling a Nietzsche or a Goethe on us, dr H...:lol:
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#43 hobglobin

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 01:40 AM

@ Mlle C, tabs & Bob: all wrong
hint: a misleading quote, the text(!) has nothing to do with ships and sea and is 19th century

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#44 hobglobin

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 01:42 AM

OK a hint then: This author was at his peake in the 1940's and 50's.

was it a deliberate typo and you chose Mervyn Peake with Gormenghast? (if I remember right, the young weird dude who messes up the castle rituals and life is described in this way, but I forgot his name)

Edited by hobglobin, 21 January 2013 - 01:48 AM.

One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

That is....if she posts at all.


#45 Tabaluga

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:01 AM

Dickens - A Tale of two cities ?
Hugo - Notre Dame de Paris ?

(Actually, I don't have a clue....)

Il dort. Quoique le sort fût pour lui bien étrange,
Il vivait. Il mourut quand il n'eut plus son ange;
La chose simplement d'elle-même arriva,
Comme la nuit se fait lorsque le jour s'en va.

 





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