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Literature quote guessing game


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2278 replies to this topic

#16 hobglobin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:00 PM

Sounds like one of Superman's or Batman's enemies...Joker perhaps...so my guess is Bill Finger and Bob Kane: Batman Posted Image
One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

#17 casandra

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:07 PM

so how many guesses were those?..and you're missing the key point....:lol:..
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#18 Tabaluga

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:10 PM

I'll take another guess just for the hint: Homer- Ilias or Odyssey

Il dort. Quoique le sort fût pour lui bien étrange,
Il vivait. Il mourut quand il n'eut plus son ange;
La chose simplement d'elle-même arriva,
Comme la nuit se fait lorsque le jour s'en va.

 


#19 hobglobin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:19 PM

and I chose Shakespeare: Othello Posted Image
One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

#20 casandra

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:20 PM

nope to both of you....a useful hint: timeline....:P
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#21 hobglobin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:31 PM

then of course: Gabriel García Márquez: Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude)
a great title btw Posted Image
One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

#22 casandra

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:21 PM

I read that and I don't remember anyone plotting revenge...but yup, a title that you definitely appreciate :lol:
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#23 hobglobin

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:23 PM

I read that and I don't remember anyone plotting revenge...but yup, a title that you definitely appreciate Posted Image

I read it too and it might be a curse of someone in all that family bullying and affairs Posted Image and it's a long timeline, but as I already guessed: your hint was only to mislead us Posted Image
One must presume that long and short arguments contribute to the same end. - Epicurus
...except casandra's that belong to the funniest, most interesting and imaginative (or over-imaginative?) ones, I suppose.

#24 casandra

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:29 PM


I read that and I don't remember anyone plotting revenge...but yup, a title that you definitely appreciate Posted Image

I read it too and it might be a curse of someone in all that family bullying and affairs Posted Image and it's a long timeline, but as I already guessed: your hint was only to mislead us Posted Image

nope, no misleading of you guys...and another hint: you don't take the meaning of this timeline metaphorically....:D
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#25 bob1

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 02:16 PM

Hmmm, someone who lives a very long time, could be the prophet from Canticle for Leibowitz (Walter MIller), but more likely to be Dracula by Bram Stoker.

#26 casandra

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 04:29 PM

Hmmm, someone who lives a very long time, could be the prophet from Canticle for Leibowitz (Walter MIller), but more likely to be Dracula by Bram Stoker.

yup, it's the threat uttered by the Count when he was almost caught by Van Helsing's anti-vampyre dreamteam as they went about 'consecrating' his earth boxes in London...Posted Image...so now it's your turn, bob1 (and please be gentle with us Posted Image....)
"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#27 bob1

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 07:13 PM

Depending on what is defined as classic literature I have two - neither particularly obscure hopefully...

First:

"His face was pale like clay and save for his eyes, mask-like. These eyes were set very close together, and were small, dark red, and of startling concentration."


Second, as people might consider the first too recent to be a classic:

"We are by kin of the clan of Geats, and Hygelac's own hearth-fellows"



#28 Tabaluga

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 07:48 PM

first one - Tolkien, Lord of the Rings ? Or Süskind, The Perfume ?


second one - no idea

Il dort. Quoique le sort fût pour lui bien étrange,
Il vivait. Il mourut quand il n'eut plus son ange;
La chose simplement d'elle-même arriva,
Comme la nuit se fait lorsque le jour s'en va.

 


#29 casandra

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 09:23 PM

second one is Beowulf (king of the Geats) although there are probably other classic lit referring to the Geats but I only know Beowulf...

first one- pale face with red eyes?....hmmm....fantasy/horror character or a drunk who only goes out at night? Posted Image

Edited by casandra, 18 January 2013 - 09:26 PM.

"Oh what a beauteousness!"
- hobglobin, personal comment about my beauteous photo......

#30 Tabaluga

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 09:29 PM

Come to think of it, the first one might also fit a vampire. Twilight by Meyer? (Not a classic for me, but then bob1 was also not so sure if it's a classic, and he said it's a recent work)

Il dort. Quoique le sort fût pour lui bien étrange,
Il vivait. Il mourut quand il n'eut plus son ange;
La chose simplement d'elle-même arriva,
Comme la nuit se fait lorsque le jour s'en va.

 





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