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Question about RNA and expression


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5 replies to this topic

#1 jamestoon1

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 10:48 AM

We all know that RNA expression is tissue-specific.
So in many studies, researchers analyze the RNA expressions of certain genes in affected tissues and compare them to matched normal tissues.
For example, some breast cancer researchers would investigate the expression of BRCA1 in cancerous and noncancerous breast tissue, so that they can know whether deregulated BRCA1 expression occurs in breast cancer.
These are what I understand from my undergraduate course.

But, recently I came across quite a lot of studies, which use blood or salivary RNA to study gene expression of tissue-specific diseases such as breast cancer.
I fail to figure out the rationale of using blood or salivary RNA instead of RNA from the tissue to study gene expression.
Could someone please enlighten me on this?

#2 Tabaluga

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:31 AM

Well, they are easiest to collect...

Also just found this via google http://iranpath.org/...71209000055.pdf , a review where they also discuss, starting from p.7, the similarities between breast tissue and the salivary glands and the respective fluids, although it seems to focus on proteins rather than RNA...

Il dort. Quoique le sort fût pour lui bien étrange,
Il vivait. Il mourut quand il n'eut plus son ange;
La chose simplement d'elle-même arriva,
Comme la nuit se fait lorsque le jour s'en va.

 


#3 jamestoon1

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 12:44 AM

Well, they are easiest to collect...

Also just found this via google http://iranpath.org/...71209000055.pdf , a review where they also discuss, starting from p.7, the similarities between breast tissue and the salivary glands and the respective fluids, although it seems to focus on proteins rather than RNA...


Oh, thanks for the reply.
Anyone else could tell me why RNA from blood/saliva is used instead of RNA from tissue?

#4 bigudukaz

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 04:24 AM

Cells from cancer tend to get into blood stream so you can get the specific genes that are normally expressed only in one type of tissue and overexpressed in cancerous tissue from blood. But you need normally expressed gene as well for reference.

#5 jamestoon1

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 05:18 AM

Cells from cancer tend to get into blood stream so you can get the specific genes that are normally expressed only in one type of tissue and overexpressed in cancerous tissue from blood. But you need normally expressed gene as well for reference.

Wow, thanks for the reply after so long.
Then how about RNA from saliva?

#6 bigudukaz

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 12:07 AM


Cells from cancer tend to get into blood stream so you can get the specific genes that are normally expressed only in one type of tissue and overexpressed in cancerous tissue from blood. But you need normally expressed gene as well for reference.

Wow, thanks for the reply after so long.
Then how about RNA from saliva?


Cant think up the way how RNA in salive would tell about the cancer other then the one that can be in the "mouth".
Maybe cancer is lifting the levels of some proteins in the blood and some other tissues react to it messing up with gene expression, but this is just jibber jabber :)




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