Jump to content

  • Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log in with Windows Live Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Submit your paper to J Biol Methods today!
Photo
- - - - -

Does this paper, completely overturn the Out-of-Africa model?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 ZephanosukeSama

ZephanosukeSama

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 16 December 2012 - 10:04 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22319157

"Global genetic variation at OAS1 provides evidence of archaic admixture in Melanesian populations.

Mendez FL, Watkins JC, Hammer MF.

Source

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, USA.

Abstract

Recent analysis of DNA extracted from two Eurasian forms of archaic human shows that more genetic variants are shared with humans currently living in Eurasia than with anatomically modern humans in sub-Saharan Africa. Although these genome-wide average measures of genetic similarity are consistent with the hypothesis of archaic admixture in Eurasia, analyses of individual loci exhibiting the signal of archaic introgression are needed to test alternative hypotheses and investigate the admixture process. Here, we provide a detailed sequence analysis of the innate immune gene OAS1, a locus with a divergent Melanesian haplotype that is very similar to the Denisova sequence from the Altai region of Siberia. We resequenced a 7-kb region encompassing the OAS1 gene in 88 individuals from six Old World populations (San, Biaka, Mandenka, French Basque, Han Chinese, and Papua New Guineans) and discovered previously unknown and ancient genetic variation. The 5' region of this gene has unusual patterns of diversity, including 1) higher levels of nucleotide diversity in Papuans than in sub-Saharan Africans, 2) very deep ancestry with an estimated time to the most recent common ancestor of >3 myr, and 3) a basal branching pattern with Papuan individuals on either side of the rooted network. A global geographic survey of >1,500 individuals showed that the divergent Papuan haplotype is nearly restricted to populations from eastern Indonesia and Melanesia. Polymorphic sites within this haplotype are shared with the draft Denisova genome over a span of ∼90 kb and are associated with an extended block of linkage disequilibrium, supporting the hypothesis that this haplotype introgressed from an archaic source that likely lived in Eurasia."

#2 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,659 posts
393
Excellent

Posted 17 December 2012 - 11:55 AM

Not at all - I would interpret this (only read the abstract) as saying that the Melanesian populations have some roots in Asia, which makes sense given the linkage of islands down from Asia towards Melanesia. It doesn't state that anything about the origins of the H. sapiens species at all.

#3 ZephanosukeSama

ZephanosukeSama

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:19 AM

Not at all - I would interpret this (only read the abstract) as saying that the Melanesian populations have some roots in Asia, which makes sense given the linkage of islands down from Asia towards Melanesia. It doesn't state that anything about the origins of the H. sapiens species at all.


Do you think that this lends credibility to the Multiregional hypothesis?

#4 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,659 posts
393
Excellent

Posted 18 December 2012 - 11:35 AM

No, not really.

#5 ZephanosukeSama

ZephanosukeSama

    member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 19 December 2012 - 10:39 AM

No, not really.


Really, why is that? If you don't mind me asking?

#6 bob1

bob1

    Thelymitra pulchella

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,659 posts
393
Excellent

Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:44 AM

Because you are asking a question in a homework forum, therefore we expect that you will have a go at answering the question yourself before we will critique your answers/supply full answers. I gave you a few hints in my first reply, something to work on???

#7 Greame

Greame

    member

  • Active Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
0
Neutral

Posted 06 January 2014 - 01:03 PM

There have been some amazing developments over the past 10 years alone in terms of the origins of man. For example, scientists recently discovered that every single person has neanderthal DNA. This means that they didn't become extinct and die when homo sapiens arrived on the scene. It means that they co-existed and mated in order for all of us to exist. I have also seen that at least 2 other species of humans, including a dwarf race on an island, have been discovered. This leads me to believe that not only have there been multiple species of humans, but legends such as bigfoot may be real and are nothing more than a different evolution of human beings.






Home - About - Terms of Service - Privacy - Contact Us

©1999-2013 Protocol Online, All rights reserved.