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cell culture neural cells easier?


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#1 lyok

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 06:13 AM

Hallo,

I have no experience in cell culture and I was looking into into it.
I noticed that for some reasons (for many organisms) there are neural cell cultures however no other cell cultures.

Is there a reason behind this? Is het perhaps easier to cultur neural cells then other cells?

#2 Inmost sun

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 07:17 AM

culturing neural cells is not simple; the usage of a cell culture cell is led by the scientific question; so, if you have a question to neuronal cells think of tissue or cell culture cells

#3 lyok

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 07:26 AM

culturing neural cells is not simple; the usage of a cell culture cell is led by the scientific question; so, if you have a question to neuronal cells think of tissue or cell culture cells


Ok.

I had the impression that perhaps it was easier to grow neural cells.

I have yet another question.
I was reading a paper and I dont fully understand this:


The AY61 cell line' has been at the laboratory for nearly 2 years
months and is current'ly at the 22nd passage. All cell lines are
currently stored in nitrogen and maintained in the
laboratory. Attempts, to clone the cell lines have been unsuccessful.


If I am understaind it correctly then passage refers to passaging, subcultering a line, right?
They just take cells from the line an incubate them in new medium to keep them growing?
It does mean that the cells need to divide?

But what does the cloning of cell lines mean?

#4 bob1

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 12:57 PM

Correct, passage (usually pronounced with a french accent so pass ahje rather than pass age) is when you split the cells (subculture) to maintain them in an actively growing state. This is usually done when they reach 50-80% confluence (coverage of growing area). You can also feed cells, which is just adding fresh medium. Cells do need to divide, but some are contact inhibited (stop growing when they touch enough other cells). Neural derived cultures are notorious for this as they have long skinny processes (arms) which are the mechanisms of contact between cells, so they can stop growing when they look like they are only covering about 30% of the area, but in fact all the cells are touching.

Cloning can mean either of two things, in your context above, it probably means that they tried to select a single cell (clone) and grow it up from there to make a mono-clonal cell line rather than a poly-clonal like you would normally get for a primary culture. Cloning can also mean that they tried to insert a plasmid into the line and then select for cells containing that plasmid either as a mono- or poly- clonal line.

#5 lyok

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 01:07 PM

Correct, passage (usually pronounced with a french accent so pass ahje rather than pass age) is when you split the cells (subculture) to maintain them in an actively growing state. This is usually done when they reach 50-80% confluence (coverage of growing area). You can also feed cells, which is just adding fresh medium. Cells do need to divide, but some are contact inhibited (stop growing when they touch enough other cells). Neural derived cultures are notorious for this as they have long skinny processes (arms) which are the mechanisms of contact between cells, so they can stop growing when they look like they are only covering about 30% of the area, but in fact all the cells are touching.

Cloning can mean either of two things, in your context above, it probably means that they tried to select a single cell (clone) and grow it up from there to make a mono-clonal cell line rather than a poly-clonal like you would normally get for a primary culture. Cloning can also mean that they tried to insert a plasmid into the line and then select for cells containing that plasmid either as a mono- or poly- clonal line.


Ok thanks for your explenation.

However, one more question.

the only difference then between passage and cloning is that when you go for cloning you only start with 1 cell that divides while when you have a passage you let the cells divide by themself and you do not have control over what cells divide and what cells dont.
Right?

#6 bob1

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 07:58 PM

Yes.

#7 lyok

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 12:43 AM

Yes.

µ

Ok thanks a lot.




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