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Declining productivity in long-term CHO cultivation, why!?

mammalian cell culture cell age continuous productivity

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#1 Damour

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 06:37 AM

I apologize if this I am writing under wrong topic, but this is concerning mammalian cell culture in small scale STR's.

In long-term continuous cultivations (or shorter fed-batch cultivations with aged cells) I have observed a significant decrease in productivity when using mammalian cells.

I am referring to cells which have been continuously cultivated in a bioreactor for at least 1 month, or cells that have been passaged for at least 2 months and then inoculated into a bioreactor.

I have also observed a significant increase in cell growth rate.

How does cell age affect productivity and cell growth rate?

thank you

#2 bob1

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 12:12 PM

Have a look for this paper: Mortality and Immortality at the Cellular Level. A Review. L. Hayflick, 1997.

#3 Damour

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 12:07 AM

Have a look for this paper: Mortality and Immortality at the Cellular Level. A Review. L. Hayflick, 1997.


Yes, I have read some of Hayflick's work and I accept his argumentation about molecular disorder, longevity and replicometer. However, I still dont feel that I can explain the fact that the growth rate increased significantly with cell age. I believe I observed the "hayflick limit" when cultivation the oldest cells, but I do not understand the high cell growth rate prior to that limit. Posted Image

#4 bob1

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 01:06 AM

besides cells reaching the Hayflick limit, you will also be getting a sub population of (a) cell(s) that have transformed - hence the growth rate. This event is rare, about 1 in 10^7 cells will transform.





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